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Accelerators form the backbone of SLAC’s national user facilities. They generate some of the highest quality particle beams in the world, helping thousands of scientists perform groundbreaking experiments each year.

Linac towards SLAC campus

News Feature

Two GEM Fellows reflect on their summer internships at SLAC and share their thoughts on representation and mentorship.

Nate Keyes and Zariq George
Illustration
At the Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) instrument at SLAC’s Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) scientists provided the first direct, high-fidelity view of how...
MEC silicon
News Feature
Silicon, an element abundant in Earth’s crust, is currently the most widely used semiconductor material and is important in fields like engineering, geophysics and...
MEC silicon
Illustration
A SLAC-led team has invented a method, called XLEAP, that generates powerful low-energy X-ray laser pulses that are only 280 attoseconds, or billionths of...
XLEAP illustration
Photograph
A look inside SLAC’s FACET-II test facility, where scientists use electron beams to advance revolutionary technologies that could make future particle accelerators much smaller...
A look inside SLAC’s FACET-II test facility.
Photograph
Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET-II).
Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET-II)
Photograph
Selina Li, Sebastien Corde, and Philippe Hering in a FACET laser lab.
Selina Li, Sebastien Corde, and Philippe Hering in a FACET laser lab
News Feature

SLAC works with two small businesses to make its ACE3P software easier to use in supercomputer simulations for optimizing the shapes of accelerator structures.

A large, complex shape is seen against a blue background crisscrossed with white lines. The shape is dark blue and resembles a brick partially topped with a thick shark’s fin. Three areas of bright red, orange and green, are on the shape’s bottom edge.
Illustration
SLAC works with two small businesses to adapt its pioneering software, ACE3P, for scientific computing and manufacturing design. The goal: to make using DOE...
A large, complex shape is seen against a blue background crisscrossed with white lines. The shape is dark blue and resembles a brick partially topped with a thick shark’s fin. Three areas of bright red, orange and green, are on the shape’s bottom edge.
News Brief

Knowing a magnet’s past will allow scientists to customize particle beams more precisely in the future. As accelerators stretch for higher levels of performance...

A magnet on a test stand inside SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.
News Feature

Edelen draws on machine learning to fine tune particle accelerators, while Kurinsky develops dark matter detectors informed by quantum information science.

Side by side photographs of a woman and a man.
Press Release

The facility, LCLS-II, will soon sharpen our view of how nature works on ultrasmall, ultrafast scales, impacting everything from quantum devices to clean energy.

LCLS-II cooldown