News archive

Browse the full collection of SLAC press releases and news features and stay up to date on the latest scientific advancements at the laboratory.

They’ll work on experiments searching for dark matter and physics beyond the Standard Model of particle physics to push our understanding of what makes up the universe.

Kelly Stifter and Julia Gonski.

The results should further our understanding of similar reactions with vital roles in chemistry, such as the production of vitamin D in our bodies.

UED transition state

The results offer important implications for astrophysics and nuclear fusion research.

NIF experiment

A low-cost, recyclable powder can kill thousands of waterborne bacteria per second when exposed to sunlight. Stanford and SLAC scientists say the ultrafast disinfectant could be a revolutionary advance for 2 billion people worldwide without access to safe drinking water.

Four cups of water arranged in a cycle, illustrating a decontamination cycle.

The first pair of towers are now at the Ontario facility, where they'll further the hunt for dark matter particles.

SuperCDMS tower
News Feature · Symmetry Magazine

Searching for the matter that hides its shine

Just because matter is visible doesn’t mean it’s easy to see.

Illustration of Earth and galaxies with icons representing telescopes.

Chemical reactions often involve intermediate steps that are too fast and complex for us to see  – even using our most advanced scientific instruments. Combining two X-ray spectroscopy techniques has now been shown to change that.

This is a graphic representation of an intermediate chemical reaction. The image shows the chemical reaction, a laser, X-rays and a detector system.

After decades of effort, scientists have finally seen the process by which nature creates the oxygen we breathe using SLAC’s X-ray laser.

Photosystem II

The algorithm pairs machine-learning techniques with classical beam physics equations to avoid massive data crunching.

This is a representation of a particle beam traveling through an accelerator.

The ATLAS experiment measured more than expected of a trio of particles in the aftermath of proton collisions. The results will refine physicists’ understanding of our universe at the subatomic level.

A series of straight and squiggly lines representing interactions between elementary particles such as quarks.