SLAC topics

Ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) RSS feed

Ultrafast electron diffraction can reveal motions of electrons and atomic nuclei within molecules that take place in less than a tenth of a trillionth of a second – information that will benefit groundbreaking research in materials science, chemistry and biology.

MeV-UED page on LCLS website

Scientists take first snapshots of ultrafast switching in a quantum electronic device.

News Feature

A laser compressing an aluminum crystal provides a clearer view of a material’s plastic deformation, potentially leading to the design of stronger nuclear fusion...

an abstract illustration of rippling waves made of shining dots
News Feature

The results could lead to a better understanding of reactions with vital roles in chemistry and biology.

UED conformers
News Feature

The early career award honors Sood for his research and leadership using the LCLS user facility at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.

Aditya Sood portrait
News Feature

This is the first direct observation of a hydroxyl-hydronium complex – important for a wide range of chemical and biological processes from the tails...

ued ionized water
Press Release

The work sheds light on the web of hydrogen bonds that gives water its strange properties, which play a vital role in many chemical...

UED Water
Press Release

They discover a short-lived state that could lead to faster and more energy-efficient computing devices.

ultrafast switching
News Brief

Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers recognizes his contributions to developing electron beams that power unique ‘electron cameras’ and could advance X-ray lasers.

Xijie Wang
News Feature

Q-NEXT will tackle next-generation quantum science challenges through a public-private partnership, ensuring U.S. leadership in an economically crucial arena.

QIS public-private partnership.
News Feature

Revealing both sides of the story in a single experiment has been a grand scientific challenge.

nuclear and electronic
News Feature

This new technology could enable future insights into chemical and biological processes that occur in solution, such as vision, catalysis and photosynthesis.

UED liquid
News Feature

Researchers have squeezed a high-energy electron beam into tight bundles using terahertz radiation, a promising advance in watching the ultrafast world of atoms unfold.

SLAC’s Emma Snively and Mohamed Othman at the lab’s high-speed “electron camera."
News Feature

Combined with the lab’s LCLS X-ray laser, it’ll provide unprecedented atomic views of some of nature’s speediest processes.

Alex Reid, ultrafast electron diffraction (UED)