SLAC+Stanford

RSS Feed RSS Feed


October 15, 2021
News Feature
External
Benjamin Lev, Srinivas Raghu and Monika Schleier-Smith were all recognized for their work on quantum physics.
Portraits of three Stanford and SLAC physicists who were named APS Fellows
October 13, 2021
News Feature
Spawned by the spins of electrons in magnetic materials, these tiny whirlpools behave like independent particles and could be the future of computing. Experiments with SLAC’s X-ray laser are revealing their secrets.
Illustration of skyrmions -- little whirlpools of magnetism formed by the spins of atoms.
September 15, 2021
News Feature
Much like crystallizing rock candy from sugar syrup, the new method grows 2D perovskites precisely layered with other 2D materials to produce crystals with a wide range of electronic properties.
Illustration of layers of 2D materials assembling themselves from chemicals tumbling in water
September 9, 2021
News Feature
The chemically controlled chains reveal an ultrastrong attraction between electrons that may help cuprate superconductors carry electrical current with no loss at relatively high temperatures.
An illustration showing a 1D chain of carbon and oxygen molecules with red springs representing natural vibrations in their atomic lattice.
August 31, 2021
News Feature
Anchoring individual iridium atoms on the surface of a catalytic particle boosted its performance in carrying out a reaction that’s been a bottleneck for sustainable energy production.
Alt text: Illustration showing surface of a catalyst as a lattice work of atoms, with single iridium molecules held above it on tiny 8-sided structures to facilitate splitting of water molecules seen floating above
August 11, 2021
News Feature
SLAC and Stanford scientists used it to zoom in on an iconic RNA catalyst and a piece of viral RNA that’s a potential target for COVID-19 treatments.
A high-res 3D ribbon diagram showing the structure of part of an RNA molecule
August 4, 2021
News Feature
Their work aims to bridge two approaches to driving the reaction – one powered by heat, the other by electricity – with the goal of discovering more efficient and sustainable ways to convert carbon dioxide into useful products.
A ball-and-stick illustration of a single nickel atom (green) bonded to nitrogen atoms (blue) on the surface of a carbon material. The arrangement allows the nickel atoms to catalyze two types of reactions involved in making fuel from CO2.
July 16, 2021
News Feature
External
An international team led by SLAC/Stanford Professor Ed Solomon used a tantalizing principle borrowed from nature to turn harmful methane into useful methanol.
Hannah Rhoda with the resonance Raman spectroscopy equipment at Stanford
July 9, 2021
News Feature
She toured the lab’s powerful X-ray laser, looked at the construction of the world’s largest digital camera, and discussed climate research, industries of the future, and diversity, equity and inclusion in the sciences.
Secretary Granholm virtual visit
July 8, 2021
News Feature
Nickelate materials give scientists an exciting new window into how unconventional superconductors carry electric current with no loss at relatively high temperatures.
Illustration showing nickelate and cuprate superconductors as cartoon characters that are either close friends holding hands or neighbors talking over a fence.

Pages