Cryo-EM

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January 19, 2021
News Feature
G6PD deficiency affects about 400M people worldwide and can pose serious health risks. Uncovering the causes of the most severe cases could finally lead to treatments.
January 5, 2021
News Feature
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Researchers at Stanford are working to develop a single-dose vaccine for SARS-CoV-2 that could potentially be stored at room temperature.
The ferritin nanoparticle, shown with red center and six blue spikes.
December 18, 2020
News Feature
The study, done on a mild-mannered relative of the virus that causes COVID-19, paves the way for seeing more clearly how spike proteins initiate infections, with an eye to preventing and treating them.
Illustration of a coronavirus spike
December 14, 2020
News Feature
The lab’s X-ray laser recently joined other facilities in making remote science possible from any corner of the world, a trend that will likely continue into the future.
Remote experiments in the control room at LCLS
November 4, 2020
News Brief
The center complements other NIH centers at SLAC and elsewhere that broaden access to this cutting-edge technology for biomedical research.
Cryo-EM images of yeast cells with contents highlighted
October 16, 2020
News Feature
The annual conference for scientists who conduct research at SLAC’s light sources engaged more than 1,700 researchers in talks, workshops and discussions.
2020 SSRL/LCLS Users' Meeting
October 7, 2020
News Feature
No human cell can function without these tiny machines, which cause disease when they go haywire and offer potential targets for therapeutic drugs.
Illustration of molecular Ferris wheel moving protons
August 18, 2020
News Brief
Stanford and SLAC scientists studying the varicella zoster virus found that an antibody that blocks infection doesn’t work exactly as they’d thought.
July 22, 2020
News Feature
A pioneer in developing methods for cryogenic electron microscopy, he directs two joint facilities for cryo-EM research and development on the SLAC campus.
Photo of Professor Wah Chui with a cryo-electron micrcoscope
June 17, 2020
News Brief
For the first time, scientists have revealed the steps needed to turn on a receptor that helps regulate neuron firing. The findings might help researchers understand and someday treat addiction, psychosis and other neuropsychological diseases.
yellow and blue protein structures.

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