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COVID-19 RSS feed

COVID-19 research explores how the SARS-CoV-2 virus breaks into cells and turns them into virus assembly lines that spread infection and identifies places where it can be blocked or attacked. This information is critical for designing vaccines to prevent infection and drugs to treat it.

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COVID-19 news collection

COVID-19 illustration

News Brief

Fan’s X-ray crystallography work at SLAC’s synchrotron moves us closer to a more protective coronavirus vaccine and a better understanding of how vital materials...

Fan wins this year's Klein award from SSRL.
Press Release

Powerful X-rays from SLAC’s synchrotron reveal that our immune system’s primary wiring seems to be no match for a brutal SARS-CoV-2 protein.

SARS-CoV-2-NEMO
News Feature

SLAC and Stanford scientists used it to zoom in on an iconic RNA catalyst and a piece of viral RNA that’s a potential target...

A high-res 3D ribbon diagram showing the structure of part of an RNA molecule
News Brief

Two groups of researchers drew on SLAC tools to better understand how to target a key part of the virus that causes COVID-19.

Illustration of SARS-CoV-2, a round ball with spikes.
News Feature

Researchers at Stanford are working to develop a single-dose vaccine for SARS-CoV-2 that could potentially be stored at room temperature.

The ferritin nanoparticle, shown with red center and six blue spikes.
News Feature

The study, done on a mild-mannered relative of the virus that causes COVID-19, paves the way for seeing more clearly how spike proteins initiate...

Illustration of a coronavirus spike
News Feature

The lab’s X-ray laser recently joined other facilities in making remote science possible from any corner of the world, a trend that will likely...

Remote experiments in the control room at LCLS
News Brief

Images reveal how some antibodies may block SARS-CoV-2 infection.

A rendering of the SARS-CoV-2 virus.
News Feature

No human cell can function without these tiny machines, which cause disease when they go haywire and offer potential targets for therapeutic drugs.

Illustration of molecular Ferris wheel moving protons
News Feature

They found that gently heating N95 masks in high relative humidity could inactivate SARS-CoV-2 virus trapped within the masks, without degrading the masks’ performance.

Medical workers donning personal protective equipment
News Brief

University of Alberta researchers worked with SLAC X-ray scientists to explore the potential of a feline coronavirus drug that may be effective against SARS-CoV-2.

Press Release

The technology could save the lives of COVID-19 patients when more advanced ventilators are too expensive or not available.

Ventilator Prototype