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X-ray science RSS feed

X-ray studies at SLAC facilities help scientists understand the fundamental workings of nature by probing matter in atomic detail.

atoms forming a tentative bond

News Feature

A machine learning algorithm automatically extracts information to speed up – and extend – the study of materials with X-ray pulse pairs.

A pattern of red and yellow dots surrounded by a ring of blue dots on a black background.
News Feature
For decades, materials scientists have focused on materials that are relatively balanced and unchanging – but not Yijing Huang, a postdoctoral scholar at the...
Yijing Huang at Stanford University
News Brief
Blaine Mooers, associate professor of biochemistry and molecular biology at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, has won this year’s  Farrel W. Lytle...
Blaine Mooers
News Feature

Encapsulating precious-metal catalysts in a web-like alumina framework could reduce the amount needed in catalytic converters – and our dependency on these scarce metals.

A web of red material encapsulates blue polyhedrons.
Illustration
Studies of atomic-level processes that drain battery life and efficiency help improve battery performance. 
Studies of atomic-level processes that drain battery life and efficiency help improve battery performance.
Illustration
At LCLS, crystallized ribosomes travel through a capillary into the interaction region, where they are zapped with a beam of X-rays. The X-rays scatter...
At LCLS, crystallized ribosomes travel through a capillary into the interaction region, where they are zapped with a beam of X-rays.
Illustration
A SLAC-led team has invented a method, called XLEAP, that generates powerful low-energy X-ray laser pulses that are only 280 attoseconds, or billionths of...
XLEAP illustration
Illustration
By detecting minute traces of original pigments in fossils, X-ray imaging at synchrotrons has given scientists the chemical evidence needed to discover the actual...
X-ray imaging at synchrotrons has given scientists the chemical evidence needed to discover the actual colors of ancient life forms.
Illustration
The ultrafast, ultrabright X-ray pulses of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) have enabled unprecedented views of a catalyst in action, an important step...
Nilsson science cover
Photograph
Undulator Hall with soft X-ray undulators to the left and hard-X-ray undulators to the right.
Empty undulator hall
Photograph
LCLS Undulator Hall with both soft X-ray undulators, left, and hard X-ray undulators, right. 
Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) Undulator Hall
News Brief

The protein could play a key role in soil carbon cycling and soil decomposition.