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Stanford Institute for Materials & Energy Sciences (SIMES) RSS feed

SIMES researchers study complex, novel materials that could transform the energy landscape by making computing much more efficient or transmitting power over long distances with no loss, for instance.

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Polarons, bubbles of distortion in a perovskite lattice.

News Feature

Seen in atomic detail, the seemingly smooth flow of ions through a battery’s electrolyte is a lot more complicated.

Photo of the laser lab apparatus used in the hopping ions experiment.
News Feature

Researchers have discovered that crystals can twist when they are sandwiched between two substrates – a critical step toward exploring new material properties for...

This image shows a diffraction pattern of gold nanodics between substrates.
News Feature

Strongly interacting electrons in quantum materials carry heat and charge in a way that’s surprisingly similar to what individual electrons do in normal metals...

An illustration shows electrons transporting heat from a warmer to a cooler area of a material.
News Brief

The American Physical Society recognized the SLAC and Stanford physicist for decades of groundbreaking work studying the strange behavior of electrons at the interfaces...

Photo - Harold Hwang
News Feature

The research reveals the potential for machine learning in understanding the complex behavior of quantum materials.

machine learning
News Feature

A groundbreaking study shows defects spreading through diamond faster than the speed of sound 

Shocking a diamond with a high-power laser produced defects that propagated faster than the speed of sound.
News Feature

Analyzing X-ray movies with computer vision reveals how nanoparticles in a lithium-ion battery electrode work.

Illustration of battery electrode nanoparticles being imaged by X-rays
News Feature

It irons out wrinkles in thin films of these novel superconductors so scientists can see their true nature for the first time. 

Colorized electron microscope images reveal defects in the atomic structure of a nickelate superconductor (right) compared to a defect-free structure (right)
Press Release

New SLAC-Stanford Battery Center bridges the gaps between discovering, manufacturing and deploying innovative energy storage solutions. 

Illustration showing a battery researcher at left, a battery at center and a grid of battery applications at right.
News Feature

This ‘beautiful’ herringbone-like pattern could give rise to unique features that scientists are just starting to explore.

An illustration of a dramatic, herringbone-like pattern in the atomic lattice of a newly created quantum material. Against a black background, calcium atoms are seen as light blue spheres, cobalt atoms in dark blue and oxygen atoms in red. Lines connecting the oxygen atoms represent the atomic lattice.
News Feature

The SIMES investigator was cited for his singular contributions to quantum materials science.

Headshot of David Goldhaber-Gordon
News Feature

If scaled up successfully, the team's new system could help answer questions about certain kinds of superconductors and other unusual states of matter.

A grayscale image showing the outlines of a complex electrical device.