SLAC topics

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Engineering is at the heart of SLAC’s scientific innovation, from large scale projects like the LSST Camera and the LCLS X-ray laser upgrade to detectors and software solutions.

Last cryomodule unload, #41 from Fermilab F1.3-06. This one will be one of a few spares for LCLS-II.

News Feature

SLAC works with two small businesses to make its ACE3P software easier to use in supercomputer simulations for optimizing the shapes of accelerator structures.

A large, complex shape is seen against a blue background crisscrossed with white lines. The shape is dark blue and resembles a brick partially topped with a thick shark’s fin. Three areas of bright red, orange and green, are on the shape’s bottom edge.
News Feature

The leaders of SLAC's Technology Innovation Directorate discuss how their group supports the lab's most innovative projects.

TID senior managers
News Feature

The ePix series of detectors is designed to keep pace with ever more demanding experiments at SLAC and elsewhere.

SLAC’s Chris Kenney holds a 16-module
News Feature

From the invisible world of elementary particles to the mysteries of the cosmos, recipients of this prestigious award for early career scientists explore nature...

Panofsky fellows
News Feature

A better understanding of the failure process will help researchers design new materials that can better withstand intense events such as high-velocity impacts.

material failure
News Feature

At the Machine Shop, Pete Franco crafts beautiful, intricate and precise parts for the lab’s latest scientific tools.

Pete Franco at the SLAC Machine Shop
Press Release

FACET-II will pave the way for a future generation of particle colliders and powerful light sources, opening avenues in high-energy physics, medicine, and materials...

FACET-II
News Feature

Daniel Ratner, head of SLAC’s machine learning initiative, explains the lab’s unique opportunities to advance scientific discovery through machine learning.

Physicist Daniel Ratner.
News Brief

Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers recognizes his contributions to developing electron beams that power unique ‘electron cameras’ and could advance X-ray lasers.

Xijie Wang
News Brief

It uses terahertz radiation to power a miniscule copper accelerator structure.

Terahertz accelerator structure
Press Release

The camera will explore cosmic mysteries as part of the Rubin Observatory’s Legacy Survey of Space and Time.

LSSTCam Focal Plane Header
News Feature

Q-NEXT will tackle next-generation quantum science challenges through a public-private partnership, ensuring U.S. leadership in an economically crucial arena.

QIS public-private partnership.