March 10, 2017

Engineers Use Soup Additive to Create a Stretchable Plastic Electrode

Paving the way for flexible electronics, engineers have developed a plastic electrode that stretches like rubber but carries electricity like wires.

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A study reveals an ultrathin material’s ability to circularly polarize light, potentially informing how they work in optoelectronic devices.

Image from SLAC's high-speed electron camera showing circular polarization of terahertz light.
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The SLAC/Stanford researcher is a leading materials scientist and entrepreneur whose research is paving the way for better batteries, cleaner power grids.

SLAC and Stanford researcher Will Chueh
News Brief

Harold Hwang and Tony Heinz were among 124 newly elected members.

Harold Hwang and Tony Heinz
News Brief

A study reveals an ultrathin material’s ability to circularly polarize light, potentially informing how they work in optoelectronic devices.

Image from SLAC's high-speed electron camera showing circular polarization of terahertz light.
News Feature

The SLAC/Stanford researcher is a leading materials scientist and entrepreneur whose research is paving the way for better batteries, cleaner power grids.

SLAC and Stanford researcher Will Chueh
News Brief

Harold Hwang and Tony Heinz were among 124 newly elected members.

Harold Hwang and Tony Heinz
News Brief

Election to the academy honors exceptional scholars who discover and advance knowledge and who apply knowledge to the problems of society.

News Brief

Devereaux was honored for contributions to materials science and was among seven Stanford-affiliated researchers named AAAS Fellows this year.

Thomas Devereaux
News Feature

The team developed a groundbreaking method that harnesses the structure of light to twist and tweak the properties of quantum materials. 

quantum control