Energy Sciences Directorate

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January 7, 2019
News Feature
Ultrafast manipulation of material properties with light could stimulate the development of novel electronics, including quantum computers.
Topological Switch Lead Art
November 1, 2018
News Feature
Revealed for the first time by a new X-ray laser technique, their surprisingly unruly response has profound implications for designing and controlling materials.
Illustration of laser light setting off vibrations in material
October 31, 2018
News Feature
Two studies led by SLAC and Stanford capture electron 'sound waves' and identify a positive feedback loop that may boost superconducting temperatures.
Illustration of study that reveals how coordinated motions of atoms boost superconductivity
October 1, 2018
News Feature
The annual conference for scientists who conduct research at SLAC’s light sources engaged about 470 researchers in talks, workshops and discussions.
Users' Conference 2018
August 2, 2018
News Feature
A SLAC-Stanford study reveals exactly what it takes for diamond to crystallize around a “seed” cluster of atoms. The results apply to industrial processes and to what happens in clouds overhead.
Illustration of diamondoid and diamond crystals
July 2, 2018
News Feature
By observing changes in materials as they’re being synthesized, scientists hope to learn how they form and come up with recipes for making the materials they need for next-gen energy technologies.
Polymorph formation
June 21, 2018
News Feature
Tais Gorkhover, Michael Kagan, Kazuhiro Terao and Joshua Turner will each receive $2.5 million for research that studies fundamental particles, nanoscale objects, quantum materials and machine learning.
Photos of SLAC's 2018 Early Career Award winners
March 20, 2018
News Feature
Understanding strontium titanate’s odd behavior will aid efforts to develop materials that conduct electricity with 100 percent efficiency at higher temperatures.
Image of magnet floating above a superconducting material
March 19, 2018
News Feature
Research conducted at the atomic scale could help explain how electric currents move efficiently through hybrid perovskites, promising materials for solar cells.
Illustration of what happens when simulated sunlight hits perovskite
February 21, 2018
Press Release
Experiments with 'molecular anvils' mark an important advance for mechanochemistry, which has the potential to make chemistry greener and more precise.
Illustration of soft molecules attached to molecular anvils between diamond tips

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