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Quantum physics is the study of matter and energy at its most fundamental level.

SLAC Public Lecture: Seeing the Universe through Quantum Eyes

News Feature

Spiraling laser light reveals how topological insulators lose their ability to conduct electric current on their surfaces.

: Against a black background, thin, glowing red wires at top impinge on the hexagonal surface of a translucent mass. Small white dots travel along the edges of the surface in two directions. Within the mass, two orange cones meet at their tips.
News Feature

Researchers discover they contain a phase of quantum matter, known as charge density waves, that’s common in other unconventional superconductors. In other ways, though...

Artist's illustration shows quantum states called superconductivity and charge density waves atop an atomic lattice of balls and sticks
News Feature

The leaders of SLAC's Technology Innovation Directorate discuss how their group supports the lab's most innovative projects.

TID senior managers
News Feature

It’s a significant step in understanding these whirling quasiparticles and putting them to work in future semiconductor technologies.

A beam of light hits a semiconductor material, ejecting an electron (blue) which goes on to partner with a hole (orange) to form a whirling compound particle, the exciton.
News Feature

Less than a millionth of a billionth of a second long, attosecond X-ray pulses allow researchers to peer deep inside molecules and follow electrons...

Illustration of attosecond coherent electron motions.
News Feature
VIA Symmetry Magazine

What is a quantum network?

As we step into the quantum age, here are four things to know about quantum networks.

Illustration of tree roots and mushrooms
News Feature
VIA Symmetry Magazine

The quantum squeeze

A technique from the newest generation of quantum sensors is helping scientists to use the limitations of the Heisenberg uncertainty principle to their advantage.

Illustration of a squid
News Feature
VIA Symmetry Magazine

More than one way to make a qubit

Scientists are exploring a variety of ways to make quantum bits. We may not need to settle on a single one.

Illustration of butterfly collection
News Feature

Topological insulators conduct electricity on their surfaces but not through their interiors. SLAC scientists discovered that high harmonic generation produces a unique signature from...

A counterclockwise pattern of swirling arrows This pattern of arrows representing the combined spin and momentum of electrons in the surface layer of a topological insulator
News Feature

Benjamin Lev, Srinivas Raghu and Monika Schleier-Smith were all recognized for their work on quantum physics.

Portraits of three Stanford and SLAC physicists who were named APS Fellows
News Feature

Spawned by the spins of electrons in magnetic materials, these tiny whirlpools behave like independent particles and could be the future of computing. Experiments...

Illustration of skyrmions -- little whirlpools of magnetism formed by the spins of atoms.
Press Release

They discover a short-lived state that could lead to faster and more energy-efficient computing devices.

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