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LCLS Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) RSS feed

The LCLS beam with its high peak brightness, short pulse duration, and tunable X-ray photon energy provides revolutionary capabilities to study the transient behavior of matter in extreme conditions. The particular strength of the Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) instrument is to combine the unique LCLS beam with high power optical laser beams, and a suite of dedicated diagnostics tailored for this field of science.

Scientists prepare for an experiment in the Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) chamber.

News Feature

Following the NIF ignition demonstrations, the prospect of developing a fusion energy source using lasers looks brighter than ever. 

Illustration featuring three SLAC scientists Alan Fry, Arianna Gleason, and Siegfried Glenzer.
News Feature

The research could lead to a better understanding of how metals behave under extreme conditions, which will aid in the development of more resilient...

MEC
News Feature

A new experiment suggests that this exotic precipitation forms at even lower pressures and temperatures than previously thought and could influence the unusual magnetic...

Diamond rain
News Brief

SLAC will partner in two collaborations that aim to speed up progress in fusion energy science and technology.

Laser engineer Eric Cunningham with the Matter in Extreme Conditions optical laser
News Feature

New research has implications for understanding Earth's evolution, interpreting unusual seismic signals and the study of exoplanets.

Illustration of earth with laser
Illustration

Deep inside rocky planets like Earth, the behavior of iron can greatly affect the properties of molten rock materials: properties that influenced how Earth...

Illustration of earth with laser
Press Release

With up to a million X-ray flashes per second, 8,000 times more than its predecessor, it transforms the ability of scientists to explore atomic-scale...

LCLS-II first light
Illustration

Illustration of how a single crystal sample of silicon deforms during shock compression on nanosecond timescales.

MEC silicon
News Feature

They saw how the material finds a path to contorting and flexing to avoid being irreversibly crushed.

MEC silicon
Photograph

Chandra Curry at the Matter in Extreme Conditions experimental hutch 6 at LCLS. 

Chandra Curry working in the MEC hutch
Press Release

Studying a material that even more closely resembles the composition of ice giants, researchers found that oxygen boosts the formation of diamond rain.

Diamond rain formation
News Feature

Researchers mimicked these extreme impacts in the lab and discovered new details about how they transform minerals in Earth’s crust.

meteor