Animation

Atomic vibrations

infrared laser beam triggers atomic vibrations in a thin layer of iron selenide

An animation shows how an infrared laser beam (orange) triggers atomic vibrations in a thin layer of iron selenide, which are then recorded by ultrafast X-ray laser pulses (white) to create an ultrafast movie. The motion of the selenium atoms (red) changes the energy of the electron orbitals of the iron atoms (blue), and the resulting electron vibrations are recorded separately with a technique called ARPES (not shown).

 Greg Stewart/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

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Illustration of a laser beam triggering atomic vibrations in iron selenide
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