Medical

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September 24, 2020
News Feature
They found that gently heating N95 masks in high relative humidity could inactivate SARS-CoV-2 virus trapped within the masks, without degrading the masks’ performance.
Medical workers donning personal protective equipment
September 21, 2020
News Feature
Using SLAC’s synchrotron, Summers improves fundamental knowledge of the role of copper in the brain and investigates treatments for Alzheimer’s disease.
Kelly Summer portrait
August 18, 2020
News Brief
Stanford and SLAC scientists studying the varicella zoster virus found that an antibody that blocks infection doesn’t work exactly as they’d thought.
August 13, 2020
Press Release
The technology could save the lives of COVID-19 patients when more advanced ventilators are too expensive or not available.
Ventilator Prototype
August 6, 2020
News Brief
The technique they used will offer insight into many different chemical reactions.
hydroxyl radical
April 16, 2020
News Feature
The lab is responding to the coronavirus crisis by imaging disease-related biomolecules, developing standards for reliable coronavirus testing and enabling other essential research.
SARS-CoV-2
March 25, 2020
Press Release
The giant cavity, in a protein that transports nutrients across the cell membrane, is unlike anything researchers have seen before.
A scientist working overlaid on a world map and images of tuberculosis bacteria.
March 24, 2020
News Feature
An LCLS imaging technique reveals how a mosquito-borne bacterium deploys a toxin to kill mosquito larvae. Scientists hope to harness it to fight disease.
A photograph of mosquito larvae.
February 21, 2020
News Brief
The 1950s and ‘60s poisoning event was long attributed to methylmercury, but studies at SLAC suggest a different compound was to blame. The findings could reshape toxicologists’ understanding of disease related to mercury poisoning.
Illustration of toxic waste being dumped from a pipe, a molecule, and a map showing the location of Minamata, Japan.
December 16, 2019
News Brief
What they learned could lead to a better understanding of how antibiotics are broken down in the body, potentially leading to the development of more effective drugs.

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