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February 16, 2014
Press Release
An electrode designed like a pomegranate – with silicon nanoparticles clustered like seeds in a tough carbon rind – overcomes several remaining obstacles to using silicon for a new generation of lithium-ion batteries, say its inventors at Stanford University and the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.
A fanciful illustration of pomegranate seeds inside a conventional battery
January 31, 2014
News Feature
Jolting complex materials with bursts of energy from rapid-fire lasers can help scientists learn why some of these materials exhibit useful properties such as high-temperature superconductivity.
Image - Pictured is the initial, equilibrium distribution of electron energy after an intense pulse of near-infrared light. (SIMES)
January 16, 2014
News Feature
While this particular material is very unstable, the research shows it may be possible to find a material with the properties graphene has to offer in a thicker, sturdier form that’s easier to craft into electronic devices
photo of zhongkai liu
January 9, 2014
News Feature
Teams from Stanford, SLAC and the University of Nebraska-Lincoln collaborate to make thin, transparent semiconductors that could become the foundation for cheap, high-performance displays.
See caption
November 21, 2013
Press Release
A single layer of tin atoms could be the world’s first material to conduct electricity with 100 percent efficiency at the temperatures that computer chips operate.
Photo - tin can and piece of scrap tin sitting on a periodic table of elements with tin "Sn" highlighted
November 17, 2013
Press Release
Researchers have made the first battery electrode that heals itself, opening a new and potentially commercially viable path for making the next generation of lithium ion batteries for electric cars, cell phones and other devices. National
photo - research with self-healing polymer
November 4, 2013
News Feature
Scientists working at SLAC, Stanford, Oxford, Berkeley Lab and in Tokyo have discovered a new type of quantum material whose lopsided behavior may lend itself to creating novel electronics.
Yulin Chen (Brad Plummer/SLAC)
September 18, 2013
News Feature
Scientists at SLAC have found a new method to create coherent beams of twisted light – light that spirals around a central axis as it travels.
Accelerator physicist Erik Hemsing next to the NLCTA,...
August 19, 2013
News Feature
When it comes to improving the performance of lithium-ion batteries, no part should be overlooked – not even the glue that binds materials together in the cathode, researchers at SLAC and Stanford have found.
Image -  A new binder material forms a fine-grained (top) lithium sulfide/carbon composite cathode, compared with the large clumps (bottom) that form when another common binder is used.
July 8, 2013
News Feature
Last Saturday marked the 40th anniversary of an historic event: In 1973, a team of research pioneers extracted hard X-rays for the first time from SLAC's SPEAR accelerator.
Photo - SSRP pilot project beamline inside SPEAR, 07/06/1973. (SLAC Archives)

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