Condensed-Matter Physics

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October 20, 2014
News Feature
Research led by SLAC and Stanford scientists has uncovered a new, unpredicted behavior in a copper oxide material that conducts electricity without any loss at relatively high temperatures.
SLAC Staff Scientist Wei-sheng Lee
September 9, 2014
Press Release
Scientists have married two unconventional forms of carbon – one shaped like a soccer ball, the other a tiny diamond – to make a hybrid that could channel electron flow in molecular electronic devices.
September 4, 2014
News Feature
Lee comes from MIT, where his team recently discovered a fundamentally new type of magnetic behavior in a mineral called herbertsmithite.
SLAC and Stanford Professor Young S. Lee
June 2, 2014
News Feature
Researchers from Oxford, SIMES and Berkeley Lab say cadmium arsenide could yield practical devices with the same extraordinary electronic properties as 2-D graphene.
This illustration depicts fast-moving, massless electrons inside the material.
April 24, 2014
News Feature
Scientists at SLAC and Stanford show how high-temperature superconductivity emerges out of magnetism in an iron pnictide, a class of materials with great potential for making devices that conduct electricity with 100 percent efficiency.
An illustration of electrons pairing up like dancers at a party
April 22, 2014
News Feature
Rolls-Royce researchers came to SLAC earlier this month as part of a team testing titanium and its alloys, such as those used in engine parts, landing gear and other aircraft components
Photo - Despina Milathianaki, a staff scientist at SLAC's LCLS, holds a series of titanium alloy samples prepared for an experiment. The experiment was designed to study the laser-shocked state of the materials. (Fabricio Sousa/SLAC)
April 16, 2014
News Feature
SLAC's Siegfried Glenzer has been selected to receive an Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award, presented by the U.S. Secretary of Energy to honor scientists across a range of fields.
Photo - Siegfried Glenzer
March 20, 2014
Press Release
Scientists have discovered a potential way to make graphene – a single layer of carbon atoms with great promise for future electronics – superconducting, a state in which it would carry electricity with 100 percent efficiency.
Superconducting Graphene Layers
January 16, 2014
News Feature
While this particular material is very unstable, the research shows it may be possible to find a material with the properties graphene has to offer in a thicker, sturdier form that’s easier to craft into electronic devices
photo of zhongkai liu
January 9, 2014
News Feature
Crafted in a single atomic layer, it could be a natural fit for making thin, flexible light-based electronics, as well as futuristic 'spintronics' and 'valleytronics.'
This diagram shows a single layer of MoSe2 thin film (green and yellow balls) grown on a layer of graphene (black balls) that has formed on the surface of a silicon carbide substrate. (Yi Zhang, SIMES and ALS/Berkeley Lab)

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