SLAC topics

LCLS-II

LCLS-II will be a transformative tool for energy science, qualitatively changing the way that X-ray imaging, scattering and spectroscopy can be used to study how natural and artificial systems function. It will produce X-ray pulses that are 10,000 times brighter, on average, than those of LCLS and that arrive up to a million times per second.

Related Link:
LCLS-II

Illustration of SLAC's cryoplant refrigerator.

News Feature

Once built, the system could produce fast X-ray pulses ten times more powerful than ever before.

illustration of an electron beam traveling through a niobium cavity – a key component of SLAC’s future LCLS-II X-ray laser.
News Feature

A machine learning algorithm automatically extracts information to speed up – and extend – the study of materials with X-ray pulse pairs.

A pattern of red and yellow dots surrounded by a ring of blue dots on a black background.
News Feature

The Stanford Board of Trustees held its first meeting of the 2022-23 academic year Oct. 17-18. Trustees toured the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and...

Aerial photo of SLAC research yard
Illustration
A SLAC-led team has invented a method, called XLEAP, that generates powerful low-energy X-ray laser pulses that are only 280 attoseconds, or billionths of...
XLEAP illustration
Photograph
The first of 37 cryomodules for LCLS-II is moved off of its truck after being shipped from Fermilab.   All the cryomodules were delivered...
Cryomodule lifted from truck
Photograph
Dominique White takes a look at the last cryomodule for LCLS-II delivered from Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory.
Dominique White takes a look at the last cryomodule for LCLS-II delivered from Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory.
Video
Aerial view of SLAC’s   campus with the LINAC in the foreground leading into the campus. The interstate 280 passes over the LINAC. Stanford...
Front Page - SLAC Full Campus
Video
Video
SLAC’s research yard in the foreground, with the LINAC stretching 2 miles to the west, and SLAC’s campus on the right.
Front Page - Drone timelapse LINAC
Video
Illustration
The ultra-bright X-ray laser pulses of the Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory can be used to strip electrons away from...
Illustration of X-ray laser pulses stripping electrons away from atoms
Video
LCLS-II’s Eric Fauve explains how the team cools the accelerator to 2 kelvins. 
Cooling SLAC's linear accelerator to 2 kelvins
Video
News Feature

En route to record-breaking X-rays, SLAC’s Cryogenic team built a helium-refrigeration plant that lowers the LCLS-II accelerator to superconducting temperatures.

Images of frost and a thermometer superimposed over an aerial view of an accelerator building.
News Feature

An extension of the Stanford Research Computing Facility will host several data centers to handle the unprecedented data streams that will be produced by...

SRCF-II