SLAC topics

LCLS Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI)

The Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) instrument makes use of the unique brilliant hard X-ray pulses from LCLS to perform a wide variety of experiments utilizing various techniques. The primary capability of CXI is to make use of the high peak power of the focused X-ray beam using the “diffraction-before-destruction” method.

Staff Scientist Meng Liang, seen in the CXI Hutch 5, located the LCLS Far Experimental Hall.

News Feature

Researchers at SLAC have found a simple new way to study very delicate biological samples – like proteins at work in photosynthesis and components...

News Feature

Using SLAC's X-ray laser, researchers have for the first time directly observed myoglobin move within quadrillionths of a second after a bond breaks and...

Image - Ilme Schlichting (SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory)
News Feature

A major international effort at SLAC is focused on improving our views of intact viruses, living bacteria and other tiny samples using the brightest...

Researchers monitor the performance of a single particle imaging experiment
News Feature

In a first-of-its-kind experiment, scientists got a textbook-worthy result that may change the way matter is probed at X-ray free-electron lasers.

The Linac Coherent Light Source X-ray laser at SLAC
Press Release

A biomedical breakthrough reveals never-before-seen details of the human body’s cellular switchboard that regulates sensory and hormonal responses.

 Illustration shows arrestin (yellow), an important type of signaling protein, while docked with rhodopsin (orange).
News Feature

A team led by Stanford University scientists is using software to breathe new life into results from past biological experiments at SLAC’s X-ray laser.

This illustration shows Tiny crystallized biomolecules in a liquid solution (right) are streamed into X-ray laser pulses (shown as a white beam) in this illustration of crystallography at SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source X-ray laser.
Press Release

An experiment at SLAC's X-ray laser has revealed in atomic detail how a hypertension drug binds to a cellular receptor that plays a key...

Image - This photo shows a medical device used to monitor blood pressure. In a study at SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source X-ray laser, researchers studied how a hypertension drug binds to a cellular receptor known as an angiotensin II type 1 receptor.
News Feature

Developed at SLAC’s LCLS, it could also yield new information from hard-to-study samples in materials science, chemistry and other fields.

Image - These charts show (a) the energy profile of two electron bunches that are separated by about 6 picoseconds, which are later stimulated to emit (b) two X-ray pulses separated by femtoseconds.
News Feature

An X-ray laser experiment could lead to new drugs that lessen the side effects caused by powerful painkillers like morphine.

Image - This rendering shows a type of cellular membrane protein known as a delta opioid receptor (purple) with a compound derived from a naturally occurring peptide (orange, blue and red) bound inside its “pocket.” The peptide compound shows promise as a
News Feature

Researchers captured the highest-resolution snapshots ever taken with an X-ray laser that show changes in a protein’s structure over time.

Image - This illustration depicts an experiment at SLAC that revealed how a protein from photosynthetic bacteria changes shape in response to light.
News Feature

Scientists have for the first time mapped the atomic structure of a protein within a living cell. The technique, which peered into cells with...

Image - These micrograph images show rod-shaped bacterial cells suspended in pure water. The dark rectangular shapes inside the cells correspond to naturally occurring crystals within the cells.
Press Release

Scientists at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have made the first structural observations of liquid water at temperatures down to minus...

Artist's concept - see caption