Stanford PULSE Institute

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November 7, 2018
Press Release
In a major step forward, SLAC’s X-ray laser captures all four stable states of the process that produces the oxygen we breathe, as well as fleeting steps in between. The work opens doors to understanding the past and creating a greener future.
Atomic movie
November 1, 2018
News Feature
Revealed for the first time by a new X-ray laser technique, their surprisingly unruly response has profound implications for designing and controlling materials.
Illustration of laser light setting off vibrations in material
September 13, 2018
News Feature
The early-career award honors a promising leader in X-ray free-electron laser research.
SLAC's Tais Gorkhover
August 6, 2018
News Feature
A new imaging technique is allowing researchers to pinpoint ways of modifying drugs to avoid side effects.
Hasan DeMirci Ribosome
July 5, 2018
Press Release
To break, or not to break: An unprecedented atomic movie captures the moment when molecules decide how to respond to light.
UED Bond Breaking
June 21, 2018
News Feature
Tais Gorkhover, Michael Kagan, Kazuhiro Terao and Joshua Turner will each receive $2.5 million for research that studies fundamental particles, nanoscale objects, quantum materials and machine learning.
Photos of SLAC's 2018 Early Career Award winners
March 22, 2018
News Feature
With X-ray imaging at SLAC’s synchrotron, scientists uncovered a 6th century translation of a book by the Greek-Roman doctor Galen. The words had been scraped off the parchment manuscript and written over with hymns in the 11th century.
hands holding an old book page in front of synchrotron X-ray imaging equipment
March 7, 2018
News Feature
Using SLAC’s X-ray laser, researchers have made detailed 3-D images of nanoscale biology, with future applications in the study of air pollution, combustion and catalytic processes.
Colorful image formed from multiple X-ray diffraction patterns.
November 27, 2017
News Feature
In experiments with the lab’s ultrafast "electron camera," laser light hitting a material is almost completely converted into nuclear vibrations, which are key to switching a material’s properties on and off for future electronics and other applications.
UED Molybdenum Diselenide
September 28, 2017
News Feature
This novel method could shrink the equipment needed to make laser pulses billionths of a billionth of a second long for studying ultra-speedy electron movements in solids, chemical reactions and future electronics.

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