Condensed-Matter Physics

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September 22, 2016
News Feature
Understanding how a material’s electrons interact with vibrations of its nuclear lattice could help design and control novel materials, from solar cells to high-temperature superconductors.
September 14, 2016
News Feature
The award honors his work on a world-class experimental station at SLAC's Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource.
July 20, 2016
News Feature
Now the startup, Lumeras LLC, has a viable commercial product, and scientists have a new tool for studying the behavior of complex materials.
Lumeras founder Andrew Merriam, left, and SLAC/Stanford Professor Zhi-Xun Shen with a tabletop laser the company developed
June 6, 2016
News Feature
A SLAC/Stanford study opens a new path to producing laser pulses that are just billionths of a billionth of a second long by inducing ‘high harmonic generation’ in a solid.
Stanford graduate student Georges Ndabashimiye in the PULSE Institute laser lab
October 29, 2015
News Feature
A Stanford/SLAC study of an exotic material known as a magnetic insulator found the walls between its magnetic regions are conductive, opening new approaches to memory storage.
An illustration of electrically conductive areas (blue) along the boundaries of tiny magnetic regions, or domains, in chunky grains of a material that normally doesn’t conduct electricity.
October 22, 2015
News Feature
An all-day symposium recognized the professor emeritus for his many contributions to the scientific community, from pioneering synchrotron radiation research at SSRL to making science policies on Capitol Hill.
October 12, 2015
News Feature
The former Stanford graduate student, who did extensive research at SLAC, is being honored as an exceptional role model for women in science.
Ming Yi
April 29, 2015
News Feature
SIMES principal investigators Zhi-Xun Shen, Shoucheng Zhang and Aharon Kapitulnik were elected to the National Academy of Sciences.
December 19, 2014
News Feature
SLAC study shows the so-called ‘pseudogap’ hoards electrons that otherwise might pair up to carry current through a material with 100 percent efficiency.
November 12, 2014
Press Release
A study at the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory suggests for the first time how scientists might deliberately engineer superconductors that work at higher temperatures.

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