2015 News Feature Archive

December 18, 2015
News Feature
The United States and the European physics laboratory have formally agreed to partner on continued LHC research, upcoming neutrino research and a
December 15, 2015
News Feature
A tour of 10 of this year’s popular science books delivers dark matter, black holes and a hefty dose of Einstein.
December 14, 2015
News Feature
Dark matter hunters of the LUX collaboration have ruled out a larger-than-ever range of properties that hypothetical dark matter particles might have had.
December 8, 2015
News Feature
SLAC and Stanford scientists discovered that a single layer of tiny diamonds increases an electron gun’s emission 13,000 fold. Potential applications include electron microscopes and semiconductor manufacturing.
Nick Melosh holds a model of a diamondoid
December 8, 2015
News Feature
Researchers at SLAC have found a simple new way to study very delicate biological samples – like proteins at work in photosynthesis and components of protein-making machines called ribosomes – at the atomic scale using SLAC's X-ray laser.
December 3, 2015
News Feature
The Precourt Institute for Energy and the TomKat Center for Sustainable Energy at Stanford have awarded 12 faculty seed grants totaling $2.1 million for groundbreaking research on clean energy, including three grants to SLAC-Stanford collaborations.
December 2, 2015
News Feature
View photos of upgrades and new equipment at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) that will enable scientists to study photosynthesis, superconductors and other fields of research.
December 1, 2015
News Feature
Scientists don’t yet know what dark matter is made of, but they are full of ideas.
November 30, 2015
News Feature
SIMES scientists have discovered how to make the electrical wiring on top of solar cells nearly invisible to incoming light. The new design, which uses silicon nanopillars to hide the wires, could dramatically boost solar-cell efficiency.
November 24, 2015
News Feature
Matter and antimatter behave differently. Scientists hope that investigating how might someday explain why we exist.
November 23, 2015
News Feature
When the Large Synoptic
photo - two scientists in front of a building - see caption
November 23, 2015
News Feature
SLAC, Stanford scientists discover that bombarding and stretching a catalyst opens holes on its surface and makes it much more reactive. Potential applications include making hydrogen fuel.
Illustration of a catalyst being bombarded with argon atoms to create holes where chemical reactions can take place.
November 19, 2015
Press Release
The Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation has awarded $13.5 million for an international effort to build a working particle accelerator the size of a shoebox based on an innovative technology known as “accelerator on a chip.”
Three accelerator chips on a finger
November 18, 2015
News Feature
Researchers are searching for a quantum theory of gravity that could help answer fundamental questions about the universe, from the very first moments after the Big Bang to the physics of black holes.
November 17, 2015
News Feature
The medal, which recognizes distinguished physicists for outstanding statesmanship in science, honors Quinn for her work in science education.
SLAC Professor Emerita Helen Quinn
November 17, 2015
News Feature
It’s not easy being clean.
November 12, 2015
News Feature
Science wonderland at the San Francisco Giants ballpark draws a science-enthusiastic crowd of 35,000 visitors.
November 9, 2015
News Feature
KIPAC's Leonardo Senatore was among three Stanford professors to receive awards during a star-studded award ceremony Sunday night. Karl Deisseroth (pictured) took a top honor with a $3 million Breakthrough Prize in life science.
November 9, 2015
News Feature
The SLAC Photowalk took a group of 17 photographers, both amateur and professional, behind the scenes to photograph SLAC's world-class science facilities, including the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) X-ray laser and the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL).
November 5, 2015
Press Release
A team led by SLAC scientists combined powerful magnetic pulses with some of the brightest X-rays on the planet to discover a surprising 3-D effect that appears linked to a mysterious phenomenon known as high-temperature superconductivity.
Image - In this artistic rendering, a magnetic pulse (right) and X-ray laser light (left) converge on a superconductor material to study the behavior of its electrons. (SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory)

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