News archive

Browse the full collection of SLAC press releases and news features and stay up to date on the latest scientific advancements at the laboratory.

Topological insulators conduct electricity on their surfaces but not through their interiors. SLAC scientists discovered that high harmonic generation produces a unique signature from the topological surface.

A counterclockwise pattern of swirling arrows This pattern of arrows representing the combined spin and momentum of electrons in the surface layer of a topological insulator

Benjamin Lev, Srinivas Raghu and Monika Schleier-Smith were all recognized for their work on quantum physics.

Portraits of three Stanford and SLAC physicists who were named APS Fellows

The results could lead to a better understanding of reactions with vital roles in chemistry and biology.

UED conformers

The early career award honors Sood for his research and leadership using the LCLS user facility at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.

Aditya Sood portrait

Spawned by the spins of electrons in magnetic materials, these tiny whirlpools behave like independent particles and could be the future of computing. Experiments with SLAC’s X-ray laser are revealing their secrets.

Illustration of skyrmions -- little whirlpools of magnetism formed by the spins of atoms.

Scientists who perform experiments at SLAC’s lightsources gathered online for research talks, workshops and discussions.

Aerial view of industrial-looking research buildings

High-power lasers will work in concert with the lab’s X-ray laser to dramatically improve our understanding of matter in extreme conditions.

diamond rain

This is the first direct observation of a hydroxyl-hydronium complex – important for a wide range of chemical and biological processes from the tails of comets to cancer treatment.

ued ionized water

The award recognizes her research and service at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource.

Much like crystallizing rock candy from sugar syrup, the new method grows 2D perovskites precisely layered with other 2D materials to produce crystals with a wide range of electronic properties.

Illustration of layers of 2D materials assembling themselves from chemicals tumbling in water