News archive

Browse the full collection of SLAC press releases and news features and stay up to date on the latest scientific advancements at the laboratory.

En route to record-breaking X-rays, SLAC’s Cryogenic team built a helium-refrigeration plant that lowers the LCLS-II accelerator to superconducting temperatures.

Images of frost and a thermometer superimposed over an aerial view of an accelerator building.

SLAC works with two small businesses to make its ACE3P software easier to use in supercomputer simulations for optimizing the shapes of accelerator structures.

A large, complex shape is seen against a blue background crisscrossed with white lines. The shape is dark blue and resembles a brick partially topped with a thick shark’s fin. Three areas of bright red, orange and green, are on the shape’s bottom edge.

One of 17 national laboratories supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, SLAC is also marking its 60th anniversary this year.

Aerial view of SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

To capture as much information as possible about clouds of atoms at the heart of the MAGIS-100 experiment, SLAC scientists devised a dome of mirrors that gathers more light from more angles.

an array of rainbow-tinted views of a tiny 3D object that spells "DOE"

Spiraling laser light reveals how topological insulators lose their ability to conduct electric current on their surfaces.

: Against a black background, thin, glowing red wires at top impinge on the hexagonal surface of a translucent mass. Small white dots travel along the edges of the surface in two directions. Within the mass, two orange cones meet at their tips.

Waves of magnetic excitation sweep through this exciting new material whether it’s in superconducting mode or not – another possible clue to how unconventional superconductors carry electric current with no loss.

A brightly colored top is seen spinning between two layers of gray, purple and red spheres representing atoms in a nickel oxide superconductor.

An extension of the Stanford Research Computing Facility will host several data centers to handle the unprecedented data streams that will be produced by a new generation of scientific projects.

SRCF-II

Researchers discover they contain a phase of quantum matter, known as charge density waves, that’s common in other unconventional superconductors. In other ways, though, they’re surprisingly unique.

Artist's illustration shows quantum states called superconductivity and charge density waves atop an atomic lattice of balls and sticks

They’ll work on experiments that search for dark matter particles and exotic neutrino decays that could help explain why there’s more matter than antimatter in the universe.

side-by-side portraits of a man and a woman

After almost two decades of synchrotron experiments, Caltech scientists have captured a clear picture of a cell’s nuclear pores, which are the doors and windows through which critical material in your body flows in and out of the cell’s nucleus...

The nuclear pore and its components.