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Stanford Institute for Materials & Energy Sciences (SIMES) RSS feed

SIMES researchers study complex, novel materials that could transform the energy landscape by making computing much more efficient or transmitting power over long distances with no loss, for instance.

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Polarons, bubbles of distortion in a perovskite lattice.

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These stripes of electron spin and charge are exciting because of their possible link to a phenomenon that could transform society by making electrical...

Illustration of spin and charge stripes modeled by computer
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Research with SLAC’s X-ray laser simulates what happens when a meteor hits Earth’s crust. The results suggest that scientists studying impact sites have been...

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Clothing made from a reversible fabric, developed in part by SIMES researchers, could warm or cool wearers and keep them comfortable, bringing down buildings’...

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Remarkable cryo-EM images that reveal details down to the individual atom will yield new insights into why high-energy batteries fail.

A lithium metal dendrite, taken with cryogenic electron microscopy or cryo-EM
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SLAC’s ultrafast “electron camera” reveals unusual atomic motions that could be crucial for the efficiency of next-generation perovskite solar cells.

UED Perovskites
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A team including SIMES principal investigator Shoucheng Zhang says it has found the first firm evidence of such a Majorana fermion.

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A flash of green laser followed by pulses of X-rays, and mere nanoseconds later an extraterrestrial form of ice has formed.

Press Release

Extraordinarily precise measurements -- within millionths of a billionth of a second and a billionth of a hair's breadth -- show this ‘electron-phonon coupling’...

Illustration of a laser beam triggering atomic vibrations in iron selenide
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The award recognizes the Stanford/SLAC professor’s pioneering work in the fields of energy and nanomaterials science.

Photo - Yi Cui SLAC/Stanford professor
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Propagating “charge density wave” fluctuations are seen in superconducting copper oxides for the first time.

Illustration of electronic behavior in copper oxide materials
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A tiny amount of squeezing or stretching can produce a big boost in catalytic performance, according to a new study led by scientists at...

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TIMES applies the power of theory to the search for novel materials with remarkable properties that could revolutionize technology.