X-ray Scattering/Diffraction

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July 10, 2015
News Feature
A new design tested in experiments at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory could improve plastic solar panel materials.
Scientists devised a new arrangement of solar cell ingredients, with bundles of polymer donors (green rods) and neatly organized carbon molecules, also known as fullerenes or buckyballs, serving as acceptors (purple, tan). (UCLA)
June 22, 2015
Press Release
Scientists for the first time tracked ultrafast structural changes, captured in quadrillionths-of-a-second steps, as ring-shaped gas molecules burst open and unraveled.
Image - This illustration shows shape changes that occur in quadrillionths-of-a-second intervals in a ring-shaped molecule that was broken open by light. (SLAC)
May 21, 2015
News Feature
An experiment at SLAC’s X-ray laser provides new insight into the ultrafast motions of a muscle protein in a basic biochemical reaction.
Image - This computerized rendering shows the 3-D structure of myoglobin, an oxygen-carrying protein found in many mammals’ muscles. The jagged green line represents a pulse of laser light that excites an iron atom (red sphere) at the core of the protein.
March 18, 2015
News Feature
SLAC study of tiny nanocrystals provides new insight on the design and function of nanomaterials
Image - In this illustration, intense X-rays produced at SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source strike nanowires to study an ultrafast "breathing" response in the crystals induced quadrillionths of a second earlier by pulses of optical laser light.
November 17, 2014
News Feature
Scientists have used SLAC’s X-ray laser to produce detailed images of tiny cellular structures that play a major role in Earth’s life-sustaining carbon cycle.
Image - A geometric structure from a bacterial cell, called a carboxysome, is struck by an X-ray pulse (purple) at SLAC’s Linac Coherent Light Source. (SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory)
November 12, 2014
Press Release
A study at the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory suggests for the first time how scientists might deliberately engineer superconductors that work at higher temperatures.
November 10, 2014
News Feature
Scientists at Genentech and SLAC have watched a key human protein change from a form that protects cells to one that kills them, providing valuable new insights to cancer research.
October 20, 2014
News Feature
Research led by SLAC and Stanford scientists has uncovered a new, unpredicted behavior in a copper oxide material that conducts electricity without any loss at relatively high temperatures.
SLAC Staff Scientist Wei-sheng Lee
September 4, 2014
News Feature
Lee comes from MIT, where his team recently discovered a fundamentally new type of magnetic behavior in a mineral called herbertsmithite.
SLAC and Stanford Professor Young S. Lee
September 3, 2014
News Feature
Scientists have for the first time mapped the atomic structure of a protein within a living cell. The technique, which peered into cells with an X-ray laser, could allow scientists to explore some components of living cells as never before.
Image - These micrograph images show rod-shaped bacterial cells suspended in pure water. The dark rectangular shapes inside the cells correspond to naturally occurring crystals within the cells.

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