Superconductivity

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July 30, 2018
News Feature
Former Stanford and UC-Berkeley physicist is honored for foundational research that peers into unconventional phenomena within exotic materials.
Photo: Ming Yi
May 2, 2018
News Feature
A team including SLAC researchers has measured the intricate interactions between atomic nuclei and electrons that are key to understanding intriguing materials properties, such as high-temperature superconductivity.
UED Setup
March 20, 2018
News Feature
Understanding strontium titanate’s odd behavior will aid efforts to develop materials that conduct electricity with 100 percent efficiency at higher temperatures.
Image of magnet floating above a superconducting material
November 30, 2017
News Feature
These stripes of electron spin and charge are exciting because of their possible link to a phenomenon that could transform society by making electrical transmission nearly 100 percent efficient.
Illustration of spin and charge stripes modeled by computer
July 6, 2017
Press Release
Extraordinarily precise measurements -- within millionths of a billionth of a second and a billionth of a hair's breadth -- show this ‘electron-phonon coupling’ can be far stronger than predicted, and could potentially play a role in unconventional superconductivity.
Illustration of a laser beam triggering atomic vibrations in iron selenide
June 14, 2017
News Feature
Propagating “charge density wave” fluctuations are seen in superconducting copper oxides for the first time.
Illustration of electronic behavior in copper oxide materials
September 14, 2016
News Feature
The award honors his work on a world-class experimental station at SLAC's Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource.
November 5, 2015
Press Release
A team led by SLAC scientists combined powerful magnetic pulses with some of the brightest X-rays on the planet to discover a surprising 3-D effect that appears linked to a mysterious phenomenon known as high-temperature superconductivity.
Image - In this artistic rendering, a magnetic pulse (right) and X-ray laser light (left) converge on a superconductor material to study the behavior of its electrons. (SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory)
December 19, 2014
News Feature
SLAC study shows the so-called ‘pseudogap’ hoards electrons that otherwise might pair up to carry current through a material with 100 percent efficiency.
December 4, 2014
News Feature
An experiment at SLAC provided the first fleeting glimpse of the atomic structure of a material as it entered a state resembling room-temperature superconductivity – a long-sought phenomenon in which materials might conduct electricity with 100 percent efficiency under everyday conditions.
Image - In a high-temperature superconducting material known as YBCO, light from a laser causes oxygen atoms to vibrate between layers of copper oxide in a way that favors superconductivity.

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