Structural Molecular Biology

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March 10, 2015
News Feature
Developed at SLAC’s LCLS, it could also yield new information from hard-to-study samples in materials science, chemistry and other fields.
Image - These charts show (a) the energy profile of two electron bunches that are separated by about 6 picoseconds, which are later stimulated to emit (b) two X-ray pulses separated by femtoseconds.
February 17, 2015
News Feature
An X-ray laser experiment could lead to new drugs that lessen the side effects caused by powerful painkillers like morphine.
Image - This rendering shows a type of cellular membrane protein known as a delta opioid receptor (purple) with a compound derived from a naturally occurring peptide (orange, blue and red) bound inside its “pocket.” The peptide compound shows promise as a
February 3, 2015
News Feature
Research reveals that the bacterial immune system can better destroy viral attackers by saving genetic records of previously encountered viruses.
February 2, 2015
News Feature
Scientists have assembled an exotic toolbox for experiments that tap into the brightest X-rays on the planet.
Image - This illustration shows a cutaway view of a type of sample system used at the Linac Coherent Light Source X-ray laser that jets samples in a superthin liquid or gel stream into its X-ray pulses. This system is known as a gas dynamic virtual nozzle
November 13, 2014
News Feature
A new experimental station in development at SLAC will expand capabilities for atomic-scale explorations in human health, biology, energy and environmental science.
Image - This artistic rendering shows planned instrumentation for a Macromolecular Femtosecond Crystallography (MFX) experimental station at SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source. MFX will expand LCLS's capacity and flexibility for biological experiments.
October 6, 2014
News Feature
Researchers have discovered that some common messenger molecules in human cells double as hormones when joined to a protein that interacts with DNA.
Image - In this rendering, the structure of the nuclear receptor transcription factor Steroidogenic Factor-1 (SF-1, shown in gray) is bound by the signaling phospholipid referred to as "PIP3" (blue and red). (Raymond Blind/UCSF)
September 12, 2014
News Feature
William Weis, PhD, chairman and professor of photon science at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, has been appointed chairman of the Department of Structural Biology in the Stanford School of Medicine.
September 3, 2014
News Feature
Scientists have for the first time mapped the atomic structure of a protein within a living cell. The technique, which peered into cells with an X-ray laser, could allow scientists to explore some components of living cells as never before.
Image - These micrograph images show rod-shaped bacterial cells suspended in pure water. The dark rectangular shapes inside the cells correspond to naturally occurring crystals within the cells.
May 22, 2014
Press Release
By finding surprising similarities in the way immune system defenders bind to disease-causing invaders, a new study may help scientists develop new treatments.
Conceptual art - see caption
May 15, 2014
News Feature
Researchers have discovered that an Ebola virus protein can transform into three distinct structures with different functions. This rather uncommon property provides new clues for the development of potential drugs for deadly hemorrhagic fever.
Illustration - Ebola virus transformations

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