Structural Molecular Biology

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February 16, 2017
News Feature
X-rays show details of an insect virus’s crystalline cocoon with sub-nanometer resolution.
November 14, 2016
Press Release
Scientists used SLAC's LCLS X-ray laser to make the first snapshots of a chemical interaction between two biomolecules. It changes the shape of millions of molecular switches almost instantaneously, like synchronized swimmers performing the same move.
Illustration depicting a chemical interaction as synchronized swimmers
May 5, 2016
Press Release
High-speed X-ray camera reveals ultrafast atomic motions at the root of organisms’ ability to turn light into biological function.
April 11, 2016
News Feature
New insights into how bacteria interact with host cells could help fight off harmful microbes.
March 14, 2016
News Feature
Scientists have determined in atomic detail how a potential drug molecule fits into and blocks a channel in cell membranes that Ebola and related “filoviruses” need to infect victims’ cells.
January 4, 2016
News Feature
Ian Wilson explains how scientists have found a way to induce antibodies to fight a range of influenza viruses, which could some day eliminate the need for seasonal flu shots.
October 7, 2015
News Feature
A tiny change in the length of a chemical bond makes a big difference in the activity of a molecule important in health, drug development and chemical synthesis
Image - Courtney Krest Roach (SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory)
July 22, 2015
Press Release
A biomedical breakthrough reveals never-before-seen details of the human body’s cellular switchboard that regulates sensory and hormonal responses.
May 21, 2015
News Feature
An experiment at SLAC’s X-ray laser provides new insight into the ultrafast motions of a muscle protein in a basic biochemical reaction.
Image - This computerized rendering shows the 3-D structure of myoglobin, an oxygen-carrying protein found in many mammals’ muscles. The jagged green line represents a pulse of laser light that excites an iron atom (red sphere) at the core of the protein.
May 1, 2015
News Feature
A team led by Stanford University scientists is using software to breathe new life into results from past biological experiments at SLAC’s X-ray laser.
This illustration shows Tiny crystallized biomolecules in a liquid solution (right) are streamed into X-ray laser pulses (shown as a white beam) in this illustration of crystallography at SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source X-ray laser.

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