Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL)

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October 16, 2017
News Feature
About 400 people attended the annual conference and workshops for scientists who conduct experiments at SLAC’s light sources.
Birds-eye view of the poster session
October 9, 2017
News Feature
Lithium ion batteries may remain tops for sheer performance, but when cost-per-storage is factored in, a design based on sodium ions offers promise; research was conducted in part at SSRL.
October 5, 2017
News Feature
The X-ray scientist is honored for 20 years of beamline and instrumentation design, operation and scientific support at SLAC’s synchrotron.
Matthew Latimer receives the Farrel W. Lytle Award.
September 25, 2017
News Feature
The X-ray studies performed at SLAC will help the oil industry improve guidelines for corrosion from sulfur in crude oil.
Oil refinery
September 21, 2017
News Feature
More than 100 students worked on projects ranging from website development to imaging techniques for X-ray studies, learning new ways to apply their talents.
September 11, 2017
News Feature
Kumar’s work, carried out in part at SSRL, explains how memristors work – a new class of electronic devices with applications in next-generation information storage and computing.
photo of Suhas Kumar at SSRL
August 18, 2017
News Feature
The Scripps researcher is honored for groundbreaking research at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource that accelerated the development of a vaccine for deadly Lassa fever.
Photo - Kathryn Hastie, staff scientist at The Scripps Research Institute
July 31, 2017
Press Release
A serendipitous discovery lets researchers spy on this self-assembly process for the first time with SLAC’s X-ray synchrotron. What they learn will help them fine-tune precision materials for electronics, catalysis and more.
Illustration of nanocrystals forming into superlattices at SLAC's SSRL
June 22, 2017
News Feature
With SLAC’s X-ray laser and synchrotron, scientists measured exactly how much energy goes into keeping this crucial bond from triggering a cell's death spiral.
An optical laser (green) excites the iron-containing active site of the protein cytochrome c, and then an X-ray laser (white) probes the iron.
June 1, 2017
News Feature
A decade-long search ends at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, where researchers from The Scripps Research Institute emerge with a clear picture of how the deadly Lassa virus enters human cells.
illustration of Lassa virus protein molecular structure

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