Stanford Institute for Materials & Energy Sciences (SIMES)

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November 7, 2016
News Feature
Focused X-rays reveal how rocks under high pressure transform into different materials.
September 22, 2016
News Feature
Understanding how a material’s electrons interact with vibrations of its nuclear lattice could help design and control novel materials, from solar cells to high-temperature superconductors.
September 1, 2016
News Feature
Researchers have engineered a low-cost plastic material that could become the basis for clothing that cools the wearer, reducing the need for energy-consuming air conditioning.
September 1, 2016
News Feature
The discovery could make water splitting, a key step in a number of clean energy technologies, cheaper and more efficient.
August 29, 2016
News Feature
A ‘nonlinear’ phenomenon that seemingly turns materials transparent is seen for the first time in X-rays at SLAC’s Linac Coherent Light Source.
Illustration of an LCLS experiment in which a sample seemed to disapper
August 15, 2016
Press Release
Researchers at SLAC and Stanford have created a nanostructured device, about half the size of a postage stamp, that harnesses more of the sun's spectrum of light to disinfect water much faster than with ultraviolet rays alone.
A researcher holds a tiny device that uses sunlight to disinfect water.
August 8, 2016
News Feature
Silicon chips can store data in billionths of a second, but phase-change memory could be 1,000 times faster, while using less energy and requiring less space.
August 4, 2016
Press Release
An interdisciplinary team has developed a way to track how particles charge and discharge at the nanoscale, an advance that will lead to better batteries for all sorts of mobile applications.
July 29, 2016
News Feature
The White House announced $50 million in funding for ‘Battery500’, a five year effort, as part of a package of initiatives to accelerate adoption of electric vehicles in the U.S.
July 20, 2016
News Feature
Now the startup, Lumeras LLC, has a viable commercial product, and scientists have a new tool for studying the behavior of complex materials.
Lumeras founder Andrew Merriam, left, and SLAC/Stanford Professor Zhi-Xun Shen with a tabletop laser the company developed

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