Stanford Institute for Materials & Energy Sciences (SIMES)

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May 18, 2017
News Feature
A tiny amount of squeezing or stretching can produce a big boost in catalytic performance, according to a new study led by scientists at Stanford and SLAC.
April 11, 2017
News Feature
TIMES applies the power of theory to the search for novel materials with remarkable properties that could revolutionize technology.
February 17, 2017
News Feature
Researchers, including from SIMES, say extracting uranium from seawater could help nuclear power play a larger role in a carbon-free energy future.
January 4, 2017
News Feature
Computer simulations by SLAC physicists show how light pulses can create channels that conduct electricity with no resistance in some atomically thin semiconductors.
December 26, 2016
Press Release
Scientists at Stanford and SLAC use diamondoids – the smallest possible bits of diamond – to assemble atoms into the thinnest possible electrical wires.
Diamondoids on a lab bench and under microscope, with penny for scale
November 28, 2016
News Feature
Squeezing a platinum catalyst a fraction of a nanometer nearly doubles its catalytic activity, a finding that could lead to better fuel cells and other clean energy technologies.
September 22, 2016
News Feature
Understanding how a material’s electrons interact with vibrations of its nuclear lattice could help design and control novel materials, from solar cells to high-temperature superconductors.
September 1, 2016
News Feature
Researchers have engineered a low-cost plastic material that could become the basis for clothing that cools the wearer, reducing the need for energy-consuming air conditioning.
September 1, 2016
News Feature
The discovery could make water splitting, a key step in a number of clean energy technologies, cheaper and more efficient.
August 29, 2016
News Feature
A ‘nonlinear’ phenomenon that seemingly turns materials transparent is seen for the first time in X-rays at SLAC’s Linac Coherent Light Source.
Illustration of an LCLS experiment in which a sample seemed to disapper

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