Stanford Institute for Materials & Energy Sciences (SIMES)

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January 16, 2014
News Feature
While this particular material is very unstable, the research shows it may be possible to find a material with the properties graphene has to offer in a thicker, sturdier form that’s easier to craft into electronic devices
photo of zhongkai liu
January 9, 2014
News Feature
Crafted in a single atomic layer, it could be a natural fit for making thin, flexible light-based electronics, as well as futuristic 'spintronics' and 'valleytronics.'
This diagram shows a single layer of MoSe2 thin film (green and yellow balls) grown on a layer of graphene (black balls) that has formed on the surface of a silicon carbide substrate. (Yi Zhang, SIMES and ALS/Berkeley Lab)
January 9, 2014
News Feature
Teams from Stanford, SLAC and the University of Nebraska-Lincoln collaborate to make thin, transparent semiconductors that could become the foundation for cheap, high-performance displays.
See caption
December 17, 2013
News Feature
An international team led by scientists from two SLAC/Stanford institutes has devised a much faster and more accurate way of measuring subtle atomic vibrations that underlie important hidden properties of materials.
Image showing laser beam energizing atoms in crystal lattic
November 21, 2013
Press Release
A single layer of tin atoms could be the world’s first material to conduct electricity with 100 percent efficiency at the temperatures that computer chips operate.
Photo - tin can and piece of scrap tin sitting on a periodic table of elements with tin "Sn" highlighted
November 17, 2013
Press Release
Researchers have made the first battery electrode that heals itself, opening a new and potentially commercially viable path for making the next generation of lithium ion batteries for electric cars, cell phones and other devices. National
photo - research with self-healing polymer
November 4, 2013
News Feature
Scientists working at SLAC, Stanford, Oxford, Berkeley Lab and in Tokyo have discovered a new type of quantum material whose lopsided behavior may lend itself to creating novel electronics.
Yulin Chen (Brad Plummer/SLAC)
August 19, 2013
News Feature
When it comes to improving the performance of lithium-ion batteries, no part should be overlooked – not even the glue that binds materials together in the cathode, researchers at SLAC and Stanford have found.
Image -  A new binder material forms a fine-grained (top) lithium sulfide/carbon composite cathode, compared with the large clumps (bottom) that form when another common binder is used.
July 28, 2013
Press Release
Researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have clocked the fastest-possible electrical switching in magnetite, a naturally magnetic mineral. Their results could drive innovations in the tiny transistors that control the flow of electricity across silicon chips, enabling faster, more powerful computing devices.
Artists concept shows laser hitting atomic structure and breaking it
June 3, 2013
Press Release
Through innovations to a printing process, researchers have made major improvements to organic electronics – a technology in demand for lightweight, low-cost solar cells, flexible electronic displays and tiny sensors. The printing method is fast and works with a variety of organic materials to produce semiconductors of strikingly higher quality than what has so far been achieved with similar methods.
Array of 1-mm-wide by 2-cm-long single-crystal organic semiconductors

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