Stanford Institute for Materials & Energy Sciences (SIMES)

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August 12, 2015
News Feature
SUNCAT and SIMES researchers have received funding from Stanford's Global Climate and Energy Project to support research related to generating renewable fuels.
July 15, 2015
News Feature
In separate studies, researchers at Stanford and the University of Wisconsin-Madison report advances on chemical reactions essential to fuel-cell technology.
June 23, 2015
News Feature
SIMES scientists have developed a cheap and efficient way to extract clean-burning hydrogen fuel from water 24 hours a day, seven days a week.
June 17, 2015
Press Release
Researchers discovered that adding two chemicals to the electrolyte of a lithium metal battery prevents the formation of dendrites – “fingers” of lithium that pierce the barrier between the battery’s halves, causing it to short out, overheat and sometimes burst into flame.
Image - concept of dendrites v pancakes
May 27, 2015
News Feature
Results from SIMES theorists pave the way for experiments that create and control new forms of matter with light.
Depiction of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb pattern to form graphene
April 29, 2015
News Feature
SIMES principal investigators Zhi-Xun Shen, Shoucheng Zhang and Aharon Kapitulnik were elected to the National Academy of Sciences.
March 18, 2015
News Feature
SLAC study of tiny nanocrystals provides new insight on the design and function of nanomaterials
Image - In this illustration, intense X-rays produced at SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source strike nanowires to study an ultrafast "breathing" response in the crystals induced quadrillionths of a second earlier by pulses of optical laser light.
February 20, 2015
News Feature
Two new research projects support the Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences in the study of exotic new materials that could enable future innovative electronic and photonic applications.
January 20, 2015
News Feature
Stanford and SLAC engineers observed electrons at work during catalytic reactions. Their findings challenge long-held theories about some catalysts, opening the door to new or improved renewable energy applications.
December 19, 2014
News Feature
SLAC study shows the so-called ‘pseudogap’ hoards electrons that otherwise might pair up to carry current through a material with 100 percent efficiency.

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