SLAC+Stanford

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August 26, 2020
News Feature
Q-NEXT will tackle next-generation quantum science challenges through a public-private partnership, ensuring U.S. leadership in an economically crucial arena.
QIS
August 13, 2020
Press Release
The technology could save the lives of COVID-19 patients when more advanced ventilators are too expensive or not available.
Ventilator Prototype
July 22, 2020
News Feature
A pioneer in developing methods for cryogenic electron microscopy, he directs two joint facilities for cryo-EM research and development on the SLAC campus.
Photo of Professor Wah Chui with a cryo-electron micrcoscope
June 29, 2020
External
Researchers have invented a way to slide atomically-thin layers of 2D materials over one another to store more data, in less space and using less energy.
Illustration of experimental technology that stores data by shifting atomically thin layers of metal
June 22, 2020
News Feature
They discovered the messy environment of a chemical reaction can actually change the shape of a catalytic nanoparticle in a way that makes it more active.
Illustration of catalyst nanoparticle and car with exhaust emissions
June 22, 2020
News Feature
External
A new lithium-based electrolyte invented by Stanford University scientists could pave the way for the next generation of battery-powered electric vehicles.
Photo of vials containing new electrolyte for lithium metal batteries
June 8, 2020
News Feature
Researchers expect the new method to answer fundamental questions in biology and materials science. First up: Images showing molecules that help guide cell division in bacteria.
June 1, 2020
External
Blandford’s major contributions range from energetic jets ripping forth from colossal black holes to cosmic “magnifying” glasses to gravitational waves.
Roger Blandford
May 26, 2020
News Feature
External
Physicists at SLAC and Stanford propose that the influence of cosmic rays on early life may explain nature’s preference for a uniform “handedness” among biology’s critical molecules.
Chirality graphic
May 6, 2020
News Feature
Siegfried Glenzer's team and collaborators from Tel Aviv University are working on a method that could make proton accelerators 100 times smaller without giving up any of their power.
Glenzer-LaserProtonAcceleration

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