Science

RSS Feed RSS Feed


Will 2-D Tin be the Next Super Material?

A single layer of tin atoms could be the world’s first material to conduct electricity with 100 percent efficiency at the temperatures that computer chips operate.

Scientists Invent Self-healing Battery Electrode

Researchers have made the first battery electrode that heals itself, opening a new and potentially commercially viable path for making the next generation of lithium ion batteries for electric cars, cell phones and other devices. The secret is a stretchy polymer that coats the electrode, binds it together and spontaneously heals tiny cracks that develop during battery operation, said the team from Stanford University and the Department of Energy’s (DOE) SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.

SLAC Introduces New Ways to Connect

Every day at SLAC, scientists from all over the world focus their minds – and some of the most advanced scientific technologies – on the biggest challenges of our day. We’re excited to introduce new ways for you to keep up with our lab's latest scientific breakthroughs, from designing better drugs to exploring the origins of the universe.

Cosmos Seeded with Heavy Elements During Violent Youth

Traces of iron spread smoothly throughout a massive galaxy cluster tell the 10 billion-year-old story of exploding supernovae and fierce outbursts from supermassive black holes sowing heavy elements throughout the early cosmos.

Copper Shock: An Atomic-scale Stress Test

Scientists used the powerful X-ray laser at the U.S. Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory to create movies detailing trillionths-of-a-second changes in the arrangement of copper atoms after an extreme shock.

Annual Synchrotron Award Goes to Longtime SSRL Scientist

Sean Brennan's decades of X-ray expertise keep pulling him back to SLAC even though he formally retired in 2008. During a recent visit to the lab, he accepted the Farrel W. Lytle Award for his extensive contributions to SLAC's Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL).

Pages