Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS)

RSS Feed RSS Feed


April 4, 2018
News Feature
When it comes to making molecular movies, producing the world’s fastest X-ray pulses is only half the battle. A new technique reveals details about the timing and energy of pulses that are less than a millionth of a billionth of a second long, which can be used to probe nature’s processes at this amazingly fast attosecond timescale.
Illustration of the LCSL "attoclock"
March 28, 2018
News Feature
The DOE’s top official met with SLAC staff and toured the Linac Coherent Light Source X-ray laser, where a superconducting upgrade is underway.
Secretary of Energy Rick Perry at SLAC's LCLS undulator hall
March 7, 2018
News Feature
Using SLAC’s X-ray laser, researchers have made detailed 3-D images of nanoscale biology, with future applications in the study of air pollution, combustion and catalytic processes.
Colorful image formed from multiple X-ray diffraction patterns.
January 31, 2018
News Feature
The new technique will allow researchers to observe ultrafast chemical processes previously undetectable at the atomic scale.
Yuantao Ding and Marc Guetg in the SLAC Control Room
January 26, 2018
News Feature
Combining X-ray and electron data from two cutting-edge SLAC instruments, researchers make the first observation of the rapid atomic response of iron-platinum nanoparticles to light. The results could help develop ways to manipulate and control future magnetic data storage devices.
ultrafast electron diffraction on iron-platinum
January 22, 2018
News Feature
The 40-foot-long segment of the new superconducting accelerator arrived on January 19, 2018 after a cross-country trip from Fermilab.
January 19, 2018
Press Release
The first cryomodule has arrived at SLAC. Linked together and chilled to nearly absolute zero, 37 of these segments will accelerate electrons to almost the speed of light and power an upgrade to the nation’s only X-ray free-electron laser facility.
A worker unveiling a cryomodule on a truck.
January 9, 2018
News Feature
As members of the lab’s Computer Science Division, they develop the tools needed to handle ginormous data volumes produced by the next generation of scientific discovery machines.
SLAC Computer Science Team
December 19, 2017
News Feature
Planning the next big science machine requires consideration of both the current landscape and the distant future.
December 18, 2017
News Feature
Innovations at SLAC, including the world’s shortest X-ray flashes, ultra-high-speed pulse trains and smart computer controls, promise to take ultrafast X-ray science to a whole new level.
Accelerators and Machine Learning

Pages