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July 26, 2018
News Feature
Their work will deepen our understanding of matter in extreme conditions and fundamental particle physics.
Panofsky Fellows 2018
June 14, 2018
News Feature
The X-ray laser movie shows what happens when light hits retinal, a key part of vision in animals and photosynthesis in microbes. The action takes place in a trillionth of an eye blink.
An image of San Francisco Bay salt ponds from space
May 31, 2018
News Feature
The researchers observed how an enzyme from drug-resistant tuberculosis bacteria damages an antibiotic molecule. The new technique provides a powerful tool to examine changes in biological molecules as they happen.
Photo - CXI instrument at LCLS
May 16, 2018
News Feature
Water is more complicated than it seems. Now a study led by researchers at Stockholm University has probed the movements of its molecules on a timescale of millionths of a billionth of a second.
Illustration showing blurring of images of water molecules made with X-ray laser
May 9, 2018
News Feature
By placing the tiniest strands of proteins on one-atom-thick graphene, scientists capture promising X-ray laser images of these elusive biomolecules that play a key role in neurodegenerative diseases.
Illustration of amyloid fibrils on graphene
May 1, 2018
News Feature
Like turning a snowball back into fluffy snow, a new technique turns high-density materials into a lower-density one by applying the chemical equivalent of ‘negative pressure.’
SLAC scientists working at SSRL experimental station
April 26, 2018
News Feature
The liquid sheets – less than 100 water molecules thick – will let researchers probe chemical, physical and biological processes, and even the nature of water itself, in a way they could never do before.
A glass chip used as a nozzle to create thin sheets of flowing liquid.
April 23, 2018
News Feature
The foils, each made from a single chemical element, are used to calibrate X-ray equipment at SLAC’s SSRL synchrotron, and were donated by long-time user, Farrel Lytle.
Photo - thin metal foils
April 9, 2018
News Feature
The new technology could allow next-generation instruments to explore the atomic world in ever more detail.
Beam from SRF gun
April 4, 2018
News Feature
When it comes to making molecular movies, producing the world’s fastest X-ray pulses is only half the battle. A new technique reveals details about the timing and energy of pulses that are less than a millionth of a billionth of a second long, which can be used to probe nature’s processes at this amazingly fast attosecond timescale.
Illustration of the LCSL "attoclock"

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