LCLS X-ray Pump Probe (XPP)

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July 6, 2017
Press Release
Extraordinarily precise measurements -- within millionths of a billionth of a second and a billionth of a hair's breadth -- show this ‘electron-phonon coupling’ can be far stronger than predicted, and could potentially play a role in unconventional superconductivity.
Illustration of a laser beam triggering atomic vibrations in iron selenide
June 20, 2017
News Feature
The method dramatically reduces the amount of virus material required and allows scientists to get results several times faster.
Surface structure of the bovine enterovirus 2
September 21, 2016
Press Release
Just as Schroedinger's Cat is both alive and dead, an atom or molecule can be in two different states at once. Now scientists have exploited this behavior to make X-ray movies of atomic motion with much more detail than ever before.
Illustration of a molecule splitting into two Schroedinger's Cat states
November 9, 2015
News Feature
The SLAC Photowalk took a group of 17 photographers, both amateur and professional, behind the scenes to photograph SLAC's world-class science facilities, including the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) X-ray laser and the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL).
August 17, 2015
Press Release
Scientists have revealed never-before-seen details of how our brain sends rapid-fire messages between its cells using SLAC's X-ray laser.
Image - This illustration shows a protein complex at work in brain signaling. Its structure, which contains joined protein complexes known as SNARE and synaptotagmin-1, is shown in the foreground. (SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory)
June 22, 2015
Press Release
Scientists for the first time tracked ultrafast structural changes, captured in quadrillionths-of-a-second steps, as ring-shaped gas molecules burst open and unraveled.
Image - This illustration shows shape changes that occur in quadrillionths-of-a-second intervals in a ring-shaped molecule that was broken open by light. (SLAC)
May 21, 2015
News Feature
An experiment at SLAC’s X-ray laser provides new insight into the ultrafast motions of a muscle protein in a basic biochemical reaction.
Image - This computerized rendering shows the 3-D structure of myoglobin, an oxygen-carrying protein found in many mammals’ muscles. The jagged green line represents a pulse of laser light that excites an iron atom (red sphere) at the core of the protein.
May 1, 2015
News Feature
A team led by Stanford University scientists is using software to breathe new life into results from past biological experiments at SLAC’s X-ray laser.
This illustration shows Tiny crystallized biomolecules in a liquid solution (right) are streamed into X-ray laser pulses (shown as a white beam) in this illustration of crystallography at SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source X-ray laser.
March 18, 2015
News Feature
SLAC study of tiny nanocrystals provides new insight on the design and function of nanomaterials
Image - In this illustration, intense X-rays produced at SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source strike nanowires to study an ultrafast "breathing" response in the crystals induced quadrillionths of a second earlier by pulses of optical laser light.
March 10, 2015
News Feature
Developed at SLAC’s LCLS, it could also yield new information from hard-to-study samples in materials science, chemistry and other fields.
Image - These charts show (a) the energy profile of two electron bunches that are separated by about 6 picoseconds, which are later stimulated to emit (b) two X-ray pulses separated by femtoseconds.

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