Lasers

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November 20, 2014
In this lecture, SLAC’s Ryan Coffee explains how researchers are beginning to use pattern recognition and machine learning to study chemical reactions at the level of atoms and molecules with the LCLS X-ray laser.
October 7, 2014
News Feature
Since the success of its inaugural experiment five years ago, thousands of scientists have used SLAC's X-ray laser to probe previously unreachable extremes in fields ranging from biology to astrophysics.
Image - This illustration shows how the first experiment at SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source X-ray laser stripped away electrons from neon atoms. (SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory)
September 11, 2014
News Feature
Three scientists at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have received international prizes for their achievements in free-electron laser science.
Image - From left, SLAC's Erik Hemsing, Zhirong Huang and William Fawley accept awards during the 36th International Free Electron Laser Conference in Basel, Switzerland. At right is SLAC's Paul Emma, who served as this year's FEL Prize committee chairman
September 3, 2014
News Feature
Scientists have for the first time mapped the atomic structure of a protein within a living cell. The technique, which peered into cells with an X-ray laser, could allow scientists to explore some components of living cells as never before.
Image - These micrograph images show rod-shaped bacterial cells suspended in pure water. The dark rectangular shapes inside the cells correspond to naturally occurring crystals within the cells.
August 6, 2014
News Feature
SLAC researchers have developed a laser-timing system that could lead to X-ray snapshots fast enough to reveal the triggers of chemical and material reactions.
Image - An illustration of the setup used to test an "attosecond" timing tool at SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source X-ray laser. The dashed line represents the arrival time of the X-ray laser.
July 17, 2014
News Feature
In an experiment at SLAC's X-ray laser, scientists split molecules into two fragments using pulses of infrared light, and then used X-ray pulses to observe the transfer of electrons.
Image - In this illustration of a severed methyl iodide molecule, electrons jump the gap from one fragment containing carbon and hydrogen atoms (right) to the other fragment, which contains an iodine atom (left).
July 3, 2014
News Feature
At UXSS, 90 graduate students and postdocs from all over the world got a crash course in how to do research at X-ray lasers such as LCLS.
Archana Raja, a graduate student at Columbia University, explains her group’s poster presentation at SLAC’s Ultrafast X-ray Summer Seminar.
June 27, 2014
News Feature
Scientists at SLAC have been blowing up "buckyballs" – soccer-ball-shaped carbon molecules – with an X-ray laser to understand how they fly apart. The results, they say, will help them interpret X-ray images of tiny viruses, individual proteins and other important biomolecules.
Image - Buckyballs, molecules composed of 60 carbon atoms, bust apart as they are struck by intense X-ray pulses at SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source. (Greg Stewart/SLAC)
June 23, 2014
Press Release
DNA’s molecular building blocks absorb ultraviolet light so strongly that sunlight should deactivate them – yet it doesn’t. A new SLAC study reveals details of a “relaxation response” that protects these molecules and the genetic information they encode.
Illustration showing a thymine molecule, DNA helix and the sun.
June 12, 2014
News Feature
Even in their infancy, X-ray lasers such as SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source are notching a list of important discoveries, and a special issue of a scientific journal highlights their unique contributions to biological sciences.
Image - This illustration represents data derived from 175,000 X-ray diffraction patterns of Trapanosoma brucei cathepsin B, a protein relevant to African sleeping sickness, measured with X-ray pulses at SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source. (CFEL)

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