History & Lore

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March 10, 2022
The lab honors its remarkable past while continuing its quest for a brighter future.
SLAC 60 years photograph taken with a drone camera
December 13, 2021
News Feature
This month marks the 30-year anniversary of the first website in North America, launched at SLAC. In this Q&A, one of the Wizards recalls the motivation that spawned the development and how it has changed the work of scientists.
Group photo of SLAC WWW Wizards in an office
January 23, 2019
News Feature
“The Worlds Within” and “Fabrication of the Accelerator Structure,” now available digitally in high fidelity, tell the story of Stanford Linear Accelerator Center’s inception and construction.
see description
June 11, 2018
News Feature
By capturing the most energetic light in the sky, the spacecraft continues to teach us about the mysteries of the universe.
Fermi scientists Michelson, Atwood and Ritz
May 1, 2018
News Feature
Approaching retirement, Jean Deken describes what it’s like to preserve decades of collective scientific memory at a national lab.
April 23, 2018
News Feature
The foils, each made from a single chemical element, are used to calibrate X-ray equipment at SLAC’s SSRL synchrotron, and were donated by long-time user, Farrel Lytle.
Photo - thin metal foils
March 14, 2018
News Feature
An award-winning mentor and networking guru, Al Ashley has placed thousands of underrepresented minority students in science and engineering summer research programs.
Al Ashley with internship program fellows
February 22, 2018
News Feature
One of the pioneering particle physicists working at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Taylor carried out experiments that led to the 1990
February 5, 2018
News Feature
Nearly 200 guests attended a symposium on fundamental physics to celebrate the former deputy director’s numerous scientific contributions, which continue to have a tremendous impact on our understanding of the subatomic world.
Sid Drell Symposium January 2018
May 10, 2017
News Feature
Sensitive gamma-ray “eye” on NASA’s Fermi space telescope continues to provide unprecedented views of violent phenomena in the cosmos.
Fermi in Space

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