Energy Sciences Directorate

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February 27, 2017
News Feature
A research collaboration designed a new assembly-line system that rapidly replaces exposed samples and allows the team to study reactions in real-time.
January 31, 2017
News Feature
After 50 Years of Operation, One-third of the Lab’s Historic Linear Accelerator Is Extracted to Build Powerful New X-Ray Laser
photo - the empty accelerator tunnel
January 4, 2017
News Feature
Computer simulations by SLAC physicists show how light pulses can create channels that conduct electricity with no resistance in some atomically thin semiconductors.
December 26, 2016
Press Release
Scientists at Stanford and SLAC use diamondoids – the smallest possible bits of diamond – to assemble atoms into the thinnest possible electrical wires.
Diamondoids on a lab bench and under microscope, with penny for scale
November 28, 2016
News Feature
Squeezing a platinum catalyst a fraction of a nanometer nearly doubles its catalytic activity, a finding that could lead to better fuel cells and other clean energy technologies.
November 9, 2016
News Feature
The team determined the 3-D structure of a biomolecule by tagging it with selenium atoms and taking hundreds of thousands of images.
October 13, 2016
News Feature
The event drew more than 400 participants, with workshops and presentations focusing on collaborations and new technology at SLAC’s light sources.
October 3, 2016
News Feature
More than 40 interns spent 10 weeks this summer helping SLAC researchers advance the use of the Linac Coherent Light Source.
LCLS director Mike Dunne with intern Temuulen Batenkh​
September 22, 2016
News Feature
Understanding how a material’s electrons interact with vibrations of its nuclear lattice could help design and control novel materials, from solar cells to high-temperature superconductors.
September 21, 2016
Press Release
Just as Schroedinger's Cat is both alive and dead, an atom or molecule can be in two different states at once. Now scientists have exploited this behavior to make X-ray movies of atomic motion with much more detail than ever before.
Illustration of a molecule splitting into two Schroedinger's Cat states

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