Energy Sciences Directorate

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December 3, 2019
News Feature
It reveals an abrupt transition in cuprates where particles give up their individuality. The results flip a popular theory on its head.
Illustration of abrupt transition in normal state of a cuprate
December 2, 2019
Press Release
Called XLEAP, the new method will provide sharp views of electrons in chemical processes that take place in billionths of a billionth of a second and drive crucial aspects of life.
XLEAP
November 21, 2019
News Brief
Computer simulations yield a much more accurate picture of these states of matter.
Illustration of a Monte Carlo simulation
October 14, 2019
Press Release
Replacing today’s expensive catalysts could bring down the cost of producing the gas for fuel, fertilizer and clean energy storage.
Grad student McKenzie Hubert watches electrolyzer at work
September 26, 2019
News Feature
The Hubbard model, used to understand electron behavior in numerous quantum materials, now shows us its stripes, and superconductivity too, in simulations for cuprate superconductors.
Diagram of electrons moving to neighboring atoms in Hubbard model
September 23, 2019
News Feature
A new study shows how soccer ball-shaped molecules burst more slowly than expected when blasted with an X-ray laser beam.
Buckyballs
September 16, 2019
News Feature
Two projects will look for ways to link individual quantum devices into networks for quantum computing and ultrasensitive detectors.
QIS microantenna
September 16, 2019
News Feature
SLAC/Stanford scientists and their colleagues find a new way to efficiently convert CO2 into the building block for sustainable liquid fuels.
Graves-Bajdich-Machalo
September 9, 2019
News Feature
SUNCAT researchers discover a way to improve a key step in these conversions, and explore what it would take to turn the climate-changing gas into valuable products on an industrial scale.
Diagram of scheme for turning CO2 from smokestacks into products
August 28, 2019
Press Release
Made with ‘Jenga chemistry,’ the discovery could help crack the mystery of how high-temperature superconductors work.
Illustration of 'Jenga chemistry' step of making new superconductor

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