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January 28, 2016
Press Release
Wrapping silicon anode particles in custom-fit graphene cages could solve two major obstacles to using silicon in high-capacity lithium ion batteries.
Illustration of silicon particles with and without graphene cages
December 3, 2015
News Feature
The Precourt Institute for Energy and the TomKat Center for Sustainable Energy at Stanford have awarded 12 faculty seed grants totaling $2.1 million for groundbreaking research on clean energy, including three grants to SLAC-Stanford collaborations.
November 30, 2015
News Feature
SIMES scientists have discovered how to make the electrical wiring on top of solar cells nearly invisible to incoming light. The new design, which uses silicon nanopillars to hide the wires, could dramatically boost solar-cell efficiency.
November 2, 2015
News Feature
A process developed by Stanford and SLAC scientists has potential for scaling up to manufacture clear, flexible electrodes for solar cells, displays and other electronics.
Stanford and SLAC postdoctoral researcher Sean Andrews with solution shearing instrument
September 10, 2015
Press Release
Using a new technology for ultrafast science, researchers have for the first time observed extremely rapid atomic motions in a three-atom-thick layer of a promising material that could be used in next-generation solar cells, electronics and catalysts.
August 12, 2015
News Feature
A SLAC/Stanford manufacturing technique could help make inexpensive polymer-based solar cells an attractive alternative to silicon-crystal wafers.
August 12, 2015
News Feature
SUNCAT and SIMES researchers have received funding from Stanford's Global Climate and Energy Project to support research related to generating renewable fuels.
July 15, 2015
News Feature
In separate studies, researchers at Stanford and the University of Wisconsin-Madison report advances on chemical reactions essential to fuel-cell technology.
July 10, 2015
News Feature
A new design tested in experiments at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory could improve plastic solar panel materials.
Scientists devised a new arrangement of solar cell ingredients, with bundles of polymer donors (green rods) and neatly organized carbon molecules, also known as fullerenes or buckyballs, serving as acceptors (purple, tan). (UCLA)

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