Condensed-Matter Physics

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September 11, 2017
News Feature
Kumar’s work, carried out in part at SSRL, explains how memristors work – a new class of electronic devices with applications in next-generation information storage and computing.
photo of Suhas Kumar at SSRL
August 15, 2017
News Feature
Tripling the energy and refining the shape of optical laser pulses at LCLS’s Matter in Extreme Conditions instrument allows researchers to recreate higher-pressure conditions and explore unsolved questions relevant to fusion energy, plasma physics and materials science.
Laser engineers with the upgraded Matter in Extreme Conditions optical laser
July 26, 2017
Press Release
SLAC’s ultrafast “electron camera” reveals unusual atomic motions that could be crucial for the efficiency of next-generation perovskite solar cells.
UED Perovskites
July 6, 2017
Press Release
Extraordinarily precise measurements -- within millionths of a billionth of a second and a billionth of a hair's breadth -- show this ‘electron-phonon coupling’ can be far stronger than predicted, and could potentially play a role in unconventional superconductivity.
Illustration of a laser beam triggering atomic vibrations in iron selenide
June 14, 2017
News Feature
Propagating “charge density wave” fluctuations are seen in superconducting copper oxides for the first time.
Illustration of electronic behavior in copper oxide materials
September 22, 2016
News Feature
Understanding how a material’s electrons interact with vibrations of its nuclear lattice could help design and control novel materials, from solar cells to high-temperature superconductors.
September 14, 2016
News Feature
The award honors his work on a world-class experimental station at SLAC's Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource.
July 20, 2016
News Feature
Now the startup, Lumeras LLC, has a viable commercial product, and scientists have a new tool for studying the behavior of complex materials.
Lumeras founder Andrew Merriam, left, and SLAC/Stanford Professor Zhi-Xun Shen with a tabletop laser the company developed
June 6, 2016
News Feature
A SLAC/Stanford study opens a new path to producing laser pulses that are just billionths of a billionth of a second long by inducing ‘high harmonic generation’ in a solid.
Stanford graduate student Georges Ndabashimiye in the PULSE Institute laser lab
October 29, 2015
News Feature
A Stanford/SLAC study of an exotic material known as a magnetic insulator found the walls between its magnetic regions are conductive, opening new approaches to memory storage.
An illustration of electrically conductive areas (blue) along the boundaries of tiny magnetic regions, or domains, in chunky grains of a material that normally doesn’t conduct electricity.

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