Chemistry & Catalysis

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September 25, 2017
News Feature
The X-ray studies performed at SLAC will help the oil industry improve guidelines for corrosion from sulfur in crude oil.
Oil refinery
September 20, 2017
News Feature
With SLAC’s X-ray laser, a research team captured ultrafast changes in fluorescent proteins between “dark” and “light” states. The insights allowed the scientists to design improved markers for biological imaging.
Aequorea victoria, a bioluminescent jellyfish
September 11, 2017
News Feature
Kumar’s work, carried out in part at SSRL, explains how memristors work – a new class of electronic devices with applications in next-generation information storage and computing.
photo of Suhas Kumar at SSRL
August 2, 2017
News Feature
Over the next five years they’ll work on getting significantly more information about how catalysts work and improving biological imaging methods.
Cornelius Gati and Franklin Fuller, the 2017 Panofsky fellows at SLAC
June 22, 2017
News Feature
With SLAC’s X-ray laser and synchrotron, scientists measured exactly how much energy goes into keeping this crucial bond from triggering a cell's death spiral.
An optical laser (green) excites the iron-containing active site of the protein cytochrome c, and then an X-ray laser (white) probes the iron.
June 19, 2017
News Feature
A recent discovery by scientists from the SUNCAT Center for Interface Science and Catalysis could lead to a new, more sustainable way to make ethanol without corn or other crops.
May 18, 2017
News Feature
A tiny amount of squeezing or stretching can produce a big boost in catalytic performance, according to a new study led by scientists at Stanford and SLAC.
May 3, 2017
News Feature
Scientists have developed a new molybdenum-coated catalyst that more efficiently generates hydrogen gas, which could lead to a sustainable clean fuel source in the future.
Graph of the photocatalytic water splitting performance
April 24, 2017
News Feature
An advance by SLAC and Stanford researchers greatly reduces the time needed to analyze complex catalytic reactions for making fuel, industrial chemicals and other products, and should improve computational analysis throughout chemistry.
April 21, 2017
News Feature
Mike Dunne answers questions about ultrafast science.

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