Chemistry & Catalysis

RSS Feed RSS Feed


December 4, 2017
News Feature
Biochemical 'action shots' with SLAC’s X-ray laser could help scientists develop synthetic enzymes for medicine and answer fundamental questions about how enzymes change during chemical reactions.
SLAC associate staff scientist Thomas Joseph Lane at the Coherent X-Ray Imaging instrument
November 27, 2017
News Feature
In experiments with the lab’s ultrafast "electron camera," laser light hitting a material is almost completely converted into nuclear vibrations, which are key to switching a material’s properties on and off for future electronics and other applications.
UED Molybdenum Diselenide
October 9, 2017
News Feature
Lithium ion batteries may remain tops for sheer performance, but when cost-per-storage is factored in, a design based on sodium ions offers promise; research was conducted in part at SSRL.
September 28, 2017
News Feature
This novel method could shrink the equipment needed to make laser pulses billionths of a billionth of a second long for studying ultra-speedy electron movements in solids, chemical reactions and future electronics.
September 26, 2017
News Feature
The early career award from SLAC’s X-ray laser recognizes Kjaer’s work in ultrafast X-ray science.
photo of Kasper Kjaer in Panofsky Auditorium
September 25, 2017
News Feature
The X-ray studies performed at SLAC will help the oil industry improve guidelines for corrosion from sulfur in crude oil.
Oil refinery
September 20, 2017
News Feature
With SLAC’s X-ray laser, a research team captured ultrafast changes in fluorescent proteins between “dark” and “light” states. The insights allowed the scientists to design improved markers for biological imaging.
Aequorea victoria, a bioluminescent jellyfish
September 11, 2017
News Feature
Kumar’s work, carried out in part at SSRL, explains how memristors work – a new class of electronic devices with applications in next-generation information storage and computing.
photo of Suhas Kumar at SSRL
August 2, 2017
News Feature
Over the next five years they’ll work on getting significantly more information about how catalysts work and improving biological imaging methods.
Cornelius Gati and Franklin Fuller, the 2017 Panofsky fellows at SLAC
June 22, 2017
News Feature
With SLAC’s X-ray laser and synchrotron, scientists measured exactly how much energy goes into keeping this crucial bond from triggering a cell's death spiral.
An optical laser (green) excites the iron-containing active site of the protein cytochrome c, and then an X-ray laser (white) probes the iron.

Pages