Chemical Science Division

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August 4, 2021
News Feature
Their work aims to bridge two approaches to driving the reaction – one powered by heat, the other by electricity – with the goal of discovering more efficient and sustainable ways to convert carbon dioxide into useful products.
A ball-and-stick illustration of a single nickel atom (green) bonded to nitrogen atoms (blue) on the surface of a carbon material. The arrangement allows the nickel atoms to catalyze two types of reactions involved in making fuel from CO2.
June 3, 2021
News Feature
From the invisible world of elementary particles to the mysteries of the cosmos, recipients of this prestigious award for early career scientists explore nature at every level.
Panofsky fellows
May 27, 2021
News Feature
Edward Hohenstein, Emma McBride and Caterina Vernieri study what happens to molecules hit by light, recreate extreme states of matter like those inside stars and planets, and search for new physics phenomena at the most fundamental level.
Early Career Awardees 2021
May 5, 2021
News Feature
With a new suite of tools, scientists discovered exactly how tiny plate-like catalyst particles carry out a key step in that conversion – the evolution of oxygen in an electrocatalytic cell – in unprecedented detail.
illustration of nanoscale catalyst particles in the form of flat, hexagonal plates evolving bubbles of oxygen
June 22, 2020
News Feature
They discovered the messy environment of a chemical reaction can actually change the shape of a catalytic nanoparticle in a way that makes it more active.
Illustration of catalyst nanoparticle and car with exhaust emissions
September 9, 2019
News Feature
SUNCAT researchers discover a way to improve a key step in these conversions, and explore what it would take to turn the climate-changing gas into valuable products on an industrial scale.
Diagram of scheme for turning CO2 from smokestacks into products
May 1, 2019
News Feature
Both are professors at Stanford and SLAC, where Martinez is an investigator with the Stanford PULSE Institute.
Stanford and SLAC professors Todd Martinez, left, and William Weis
July 25, 2018
News Feature
Tony Heinz and Z-X Shen will receive funding for research focused on catalysis and novel states of matter.