Biological Sciences

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August 18, 2017
News Feature
The Scripps researcher is honored for groundbreaking research at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource that accelerated the development of a vaccine for deadly Lassa fever.
Photo - Kathryn Hastie, staff scientist at The Scripps Research Institute
August 17, 2017
News Feature
With SLAC’s X-ray laser, scientists captured a virus changing shape and rearranging its genome to invade a cell.
The AMO (Atomic, Molecular & Optical Science) instrument
June 22, 2017
News Feature
A new X-ray laser technique allows scientists to home in on these single-electron triggers to better understand organic molecules that respond to light, including receptors in your eyes, plastic products and DNA building blocks that need to protect themselves from cancer-causing mutations.
June 22, 2017
News Feature
With SLAC’s X-ray laser and synchrotron, scientists measured exactly how much energy goes into keeping this crucial bond from triggering a cell's death spiral.
An optical laser (green) excites the iron-containing active site of the protein cytochrome c, and then an X-ray laser (white) probes the iron.
June 20, 2017
News Feature
The method dramatically reduces the amount of virus material required and allows scientists to get results several times faster.
Surface structure of the bovine enterovirus 2
June 1, 2017
News Feature
A decade-long search ends at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, where researchers from The Scripps Research Institute emerge with a clear picture of how the deadly Lassa virus enters human cells.
illustration of Lassa virus protein molecular structure
April 21, 2017
News Feature
Mike Dunne answers questions about ultrafast science.
April 21, 2017
News Feature
Researchers at SLAC are already looking at the largely unexplored realm of attosecond science.
April 20, 2017
News Feature
Our ultrafast science factsheet gives an overview of the femtosecond world.
April 19, 2017
News Feature
PULSE scientist Amy Cordones-Hahn describes her work on chemical reactions that turn sunlight into useable energy.

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