Biological Sciences

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April 11, 2016
News Feature
New insights into how bacteria interact with host cells could help fight off harmful microbes.
March 14, 2016
News Feature
Scientists have determined in atomic detail how a potential drug molecule fits into and blocks a channel in cell membranes that Ebola and related “filoviruses” need to infect victims’ cells.
March 9, 2016
News Feature
Toward next-generation electronics, better medications and green energy solutions: "The First Five Years" point to a bright future of high-impact discovery at LCLS.
February 10, 2016
Press Release
A new study with the LCLS X-ray laser could change the way researchers take atomic-level snapshots of important biological machineries, potentially affecting research in drug development, clean energy production and many more areas.
January 21, 2016
News Feature
For the first time in three years, LCLS has added a new instrument to its set of experimental stations. See photos of the brand new MFX hutch, LCLS’s seventh instrument.
January 4, 2016
News Feature
Ian Wilson explains how scientists have found a way to induce antibodies to fight a range of influenza viruses, which could some day eliminate the need for seasonal flu shots.
December 8, 2015
News Feature
Researchers at SLAC have found a simple new way to study very delicate biological samples – like proteins at work in photosynthesis and components of protein-making machines called ribosomes – at the atomic scale using SLAC's X-ray laser.
October 14, 2015
X-ray research on 80-million-year-old fossilized burrows, likely the work of tiny marine worms, is helping scientists understand how living organisms affected the chemistry of the sea floor.
Image - This marine worm, commonly known as a ragworm, can grow up to 4 inches in length. It is part of a class of worms known as polychaetes. A far smaller variety of polychaetes was likely responsible for creating ancient burrows studied at SLAC.
October 7, 2015
News Feature
A tiny change in the length of a chemical bond makes a big difference in the activity of a molecule important in health, drug development and chemical synthesis
Image - Courtney Krest Roach (SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory)
September 16, 2015
News Feature
Using SLAC's X-ray laser, researchers have for the first time directly observed myoglobin move within quadrillionths of a second after a bond breaks and the protein releases a gas molecule.
Image - Ilme Schlichting (SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory)

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