Advanced Accelerator R&D

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April 9, 2014
News Feature
Five years ago, the brightest source of X-rays on the planet lit up at SLAC. The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) X-ray laser's scientific and technical progress since its momentous "first light" have been no less luminous, say those who have played a role in its success.
Image - Some of the LCLS team members stand by the newly installed undulators in this 2009 photo. From right: Mike Zurawel, Geoff Pile from Argonne National Laboratory, Paul Emma, Dave Schultz, Heinz-Dieter Nuhn and Don Schafer. (Brad Plummer)
March 26, 2014
One common stereotype of a theoretical physicist is the solitary scientist, scribbling away in his or her office and only emerging when there’s a "Eureka!" in the offing. SLAC accelerator physicist Gennady Stupakov would beg to differ.
Photo - Gennady Stupakov, SLAC accelerator theorist.
March 12, 2014
News Feature
Stanford graduate student Spencer Gessner has received a Siemann fellowship to help him continue his research into cutting-edge accelerator physics at SLAC's Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests.
Photo – Spencer Gessner, 2014 Siemann Fellow
March 10, 2014
News Feature
A new system at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory's X-ray laser narrows a rainbow spectrum of X-ray colors to a more intense band of light, creating a much more powerful way to view fine details in samples at the scale of atoms and molecules.
Photo - A view of the soft X-ray self-seeding system during installation in the Undulator Hall at SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source X-ray laser. (Brad Plummer/SLAC)
March 7, 2014
News Feature
SLAC accelerator physicists have been instrumental in creating a vital part of a future Higgs boson-producing linear accelerator, from developing the initial design nearly 15 years ago to its successful demonstration in 2013.
Photo - SLAC members of the ATF2 collaboration
March 5, 2014
News Feature
A cooperative agreement with Palo-Alto based CPI opens the door to routine commercial manufacturing of these powerful vacuum tube devices, which convert electron beams into microwaves that are used to accelerate subatomic particles.
CPI President and Chief Operating Officer Robert A. Fickett, left, and SLAC Lab Director Chi-Chang Kao look at one of the XL5 klystrons the company built under a cooperative agreement with SLAC.
October 24, 2013
News Feature
FACET postdoc Sébastien Corde has been recognized not once, not twice, not three times, but four times for his research into developing small, economical sources of X-rays using laser-plasma interactions.
Photo – Sébastien Corde, an accelerator physicist at SLAC, accepts the John Dawson Thesis Prize from plasma physicist Robert Bingham. (Scott Green)
September 27, 2013
Press Release
In an advance that could dramatically shrink particle accelerators for science and medicine, researchers used a laser to accelerate electrons at a rate 10 times higher than conventional technology in a nanostructured glass chip smaller than a grain of rice.
Photo of two accelerator chips on the tip of a finger
September 18, 2013
News Feature
Scientists at SLAC have found a new method to create coherent beams of twisted light – light that spirals around a central axis as it travels.
Accelerator physicist Erik Hemsing next to the NLCTA,...
September 10, 2013
News Feature
Dao Xiang, a SLAC accelerator physicist, has received an international award for his work on a technique for tuning an electron beam with a laser to produce X-ray pulses with more uniform and predictable properties.
Dao Xiang. (Matt Beardsley/SLAC)

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